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Sticky Price And Sticky Information Price-Setting Models: What Is The Difference?

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  • BENJAMIN D. KEEN

Abstract

"Using a partial equilibrium framework, Mankiw and Reis show that a sticky information model can generate a lagged and gradual inflation response after a monetary policy shock, whereas a sticky price model cannot. Our study demonstrates that the finding is sensitive to their model's parameterization. To determine a plausible parameterization, we specify a general equilibrium model with sticky information. In that model, we find that inflation peaks only one period after a monetary disturbance. A sensitivity analysis of our results reveals that the inflation peak is delayed by including real rigidities when the monetary policy instrument is money growth, whereas inflation peaks immediately when the policy instrument is the nominal interest rate. "("JEL "E31, E32, E52) Copyright 2007 Western Economic Association International.

Suggested Citation

  • Benjamin D. Keen, 2007. "Sticky Price And Sticky Information Price-Setting Models: What Is The Difference?," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(4), pages 770-786, October.
  • Handle: RePEc:bla:ecinqu:v:45:y:2007:i:4:p:770-786
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Wang, Pengfei & Wen, Yi, 2007. "Inflation dynamics: A cross-country investigation," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 54(7), pages 2004-2031, October.
    2. Arslan, M. Murat, 2008. "Dynamics of sticky information and sticky price models in a New Keynesian DSGE framework," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 25(6), pages 1276-1294, November.
    3. Pengfei Wang & Yi Wen, 2006. "Solving linear difference systems with lagged expectations by a method of undetermined coefficients," Working Papers 2006-003, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis.
    4. Andres, Javier & Lopez-Salido, J. David & Nelson, Edward, 2005. "Sticky-price models and the natural rate hypothesis," Journal of Monetary Economics, Elsevier, vol. 52(5), pages 1025-1053, July.
    5. Meyer-Gohde, Alexander, 2010. "Linear rational-expectations models with lagged expectations: A synthetic method," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 34(5), pages 984-1002, May.
    6. McCallum, Bennett T., 2008. "Reconsideration of the P-bar model of gradual price adjustment," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 52(8), pages 1480-1493, November.
    7. Fabio Verona & Maik Wolters, 2014. "Sticky Information Models in Dynare," Computational Economics, Springer;Society for Computational Economics, vol. 43(3), pages 357-370, March.
    8. Traficante, Guido, 2013. "Monetary policy, parameter uncertainty and welfare," Journal of Macroeconomics, Elsevier, vol. 35(C), pages 73-80.
    9. Arslan, M. Murat, 2010. "Relative importance of sticky prices and sticky information in price setting," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 27(5), pages 1124-1135, September.
    10. Bruchez, Pierre-Alain, 2007. "A Hybrid Sticky-Price and Sticky-Information Model," MPRA Paper 3540, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Trabandt, Mathias, 2003. "Sticky Information vs. Sticky Prices : A Horse Race in a DSGE Framework," SFB 373 Discussion Papers 2003,41, Humboldt University of Berlin, Interdisciplinary Research Project 373: Quantification and Simulation of Economic Processes.
    12. Benjamin D. Keen & Evan F. Koenig, 2009. "How robust are popular models of nominal frictions?," Working Papers 0903, Federal Reserve Bank of Dallas.
    13. Alexander Meyer-Gohde, 2008. "The Natural Rate Hypothesis and Real Determinacy," SFB 649 Discussion Papers SFB649DP2008-054, Sonderforschungsbereich 649, Humboldt University, Berlin, Germany.
    14. Wang, Peng-fei & Wen, Yi, 2006. "Another look at sticky prices and output persistence," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 30(12), pages 2533-2552, December.
    15. Ekinci, Mehmet Fatih, 2017. "Inattentive consumers and international business cycles," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 1-27.
    16. Francesco Giuli, 2007. "Robust control in a Sticky information economy," Working Papers 98, University of Rome La Sapienza, Department of Public Economics.
    17. M. Murat Arslan, 2013. "Optimal Monetary Policy With The Sticky Information Model Of Price Adjustment: Inflation Or Price-Level Targeting?," Bulletin of Economic Research, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 65, pages 106-129, May.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E31 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Price Level; Inflation; Deflation
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles
    • E52 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Monetary Policy

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