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The intergenerational transmission of liberal professions: nepotism versus abilities

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  • Carmen Aina
  • Cheti Nicoletti

Abstract

By using university administrative and survey data on Italian graduates, we analyse the transmission of liberal professions from fathers to children. We assess the effect of nepotism and family networking, separately from other transmission channels, on the probability of choosing a degree that gives access to liberal professions, of obtaining a licensing and of starting a liberal profession. The results suggest that the effect of nepotism and networking is irrelevant on the degree choice, modest on the success rate at the licensing exam, but large and significant on the probability to start a liberal profession.

Suggested Citation

  • Carmen Aina & Cheti Nicoletti, 2014. "The intergenerational transmission of liberal professions: nepotism versus abilities," Discussion Papers 14/14, Department of Economics, University of York.
  • Handle: RePEc:yor:yorken:14/14
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Raitano Michele & Francesco Vona, 2015. "From the cradle to the grave : the effect of family background on the career path of italian men," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-05, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    2. Mocetti, Sauro, 2016. "Dynasties in professions and the role of rents and regulation: Evidence from Italian pharmacies," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 133(C), pages 1-10.
    3. Raitano Michele & Francesco Vona, 2015. "From the cradle to the grave : the effect of family background on the career path of italian men," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2015-05, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    4. Chen, Liwen & Gordanier, John & Ozturk, Orgul, 2016. "Following (Not Quite) in Your Father’s Footsteps: Task Followers and Labor Market Outcomes," MPRA Paper 76041, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Professional licensing; liberal profession; intergenerational mobility; nepotism;

    JEL classification:

    • J44 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Particular Labor Markets - - - Professional Labor Markets and Occupations
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity

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