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He's a Chip Off the Old Block - The Persistence of Occupational Choices Across Generations

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  • Bodo Knoll
  • Nadine Riedel
  • Eva Schlenker

Abstract

The purpose of this paper is to assess intergenerational occupational mobility in Germany. Using data from the Socioeconomic Panel (SOEP), we find a high persistence of occupational choices across fathers and children. To separate effects related to parental advice and influence (nurture) from genetic factors (nature), we determine the persistence separately for children who grew up with their biological fathers and those who did not. The results suggest that nurture-related effects explain a significant fraction of the observed correlation of fathers’ and children’s occupational choices. We discuss policy implications that follow from the analysis.

Suggested Citation

  • Bodo Knoll & Nadine Riedel & Eva Schlenker, 2013. "He's a Chip Off the Old Block - The Persistence of Occupational Choices Across Generations," CESifo Working Paper Series 4428, CESifo.
  • Handle: RePEc:ces:ceswps:_4428
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Facundo Albornoz & Antonio Cabrales & Esther Hauk, 2014. "Which club should I attend, Dad?: Targeted socialization and production," Working Papers 2014-20, FEDEA.
    2. Liwen Chen & John Gordanier & Orgul Ozturk, 2019. "Task Followers and Labor Market Outcomes," Journal of Labor Research, Springer, vol. 40(2), pages 181-201, June.
    3. Flohr, Matthias & Menze, Laura & Protsch, Paula, 2020. "Berufliche Aspirationen im Kontext regionaler Berufsstrukturen [Occupational Aspirations in the Context of Regional Occupational Structures]," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - Leibniz Information Centre for Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    occupational choice; German SOEP; parental educational investment;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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