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The long-lasting effects of family background: A European cross-country comparison

  • Mazzonna, Fabrizio

    ()

    (Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA))

This paper investigates how and to what extent disparities in family socio-economic status (SES) during childhood have long-lasting effects on old-age health, income and cognition. Further, it examines the variability of these effects across 13 European countries using the Survey on Health, Aging and Retirement in Europe (SHARE) and SHARELIFE that collect retrospective information on respondents’ family backgrounds during their childhoods. The results confirm the crucial role of family SES during childhood in determining old-age outcomes and show large cross-country variability. Education seems to be the main channel for this gradient and explains most of the estimated cross-country differences. We argue that such a result can be explained with the different efforts of the European countries in promoting full time education.

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Paper provided by Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy in its series MEA discussion paper series with number 11245.

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Date of creation: 14 Sep 2011
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Handle: RePEc:mea:meawpa:11245
Contact details of provider: Postal: Munich Center for the Economics of Aging (MEA) at the Max Planck Institute for Social Law and Social Policy, Amalienstraße 33, 80799 München, Germany
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