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Occupational change in Britain and Germany

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  • Longhi, Simonetta
  • Brynin, Malcolm

Abstract

We use British and German panel data to analyse job changes involving a change in occupation. We assess: (1) the extent of occupational change, taking into account the possibility of measurement error in occupational codes; (2) whether job changes within the occupation differ from occupation changes in terms of the characteristics of those making such switches; and (3) the effects of the two kinds of moves in respect of wages and job satisfaction. We find that occupation changes differ from other job changes, generally reflecting a less satisfactory employment situation, but also that the move in both cases is positive in respect of change in wages and job satisfaction.

Suggested Citation

  • Longhi, Simonetta & Brynin, Malcolm, 2010. "Occupational change in Britain and Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(4), pages 655-666, August.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:labeco:v:17:y:2010:i:4:p:655-666
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    Cited by:

    1. Bodo Knoll & Nadine Riedel & Eva Schlenker, 2017. "He's a Chip Off the Old Block — The Persistence of Occupational Choices Across Generations," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 31(2), pages 174-203, June.
    2. Hof, Stefanie & Strupler Leiser, Mirjam & Wolter, Stefan C., 2011. "Career Changers in Teaching Jobs: A Case Study Based on the Swiss Vocational Education System," IZA Discussion Papers 5806, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Brynin, Malcolm, 2010. "Social class as a moving average," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-06, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    4. Fitzenberger, Bernd & Licklederer, Stefanie & Zwiener, Hanna, 2015. "Mobility across firms and occupations among graduates from apprenticeship," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 34(C), pages 138-151.
    5. Francis Green & Golo Henseke, 2016. "The changing graduate labour market: analysis using a new indicator of graduate jobs," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 5(1), pages 1-25, December.
    6. Reichelt, Malte & Abraham, Martin, 2015. "Occupational and regional mobility as substitutes : a new approach to understanding job changes and wage inequality," IAB Discussion Paper 201514, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    7. Lalé, Etienne, 2012. "Trends in occupational mobility in France: 1982–2009," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 19(3), pages 373-387.
    8. Huu Chi Nguyen & Christophe Nordman, 2014. "Household entrepreneurship and social networks:panel data evidence from Vietnam," Working Papers DT/2014/22, DIAL (Développement, Institutions et Mondialisation).
    9. Simonetta Longhi & Mark Taylor, 2013. "Occupational Change and Mobility Among Employed and Unemployed Job Seekers," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 60(1), pages 71-100, February.
    10. repec:bla:ecinqu:v:55:y:2017:i:2:p:1064-1090 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Stefanie Hof & Mirjam Strupler & Stefan C. Wolter, 2011. "Quereinsteiger in den Lehrberuf am Beispiel der schweizerischen Berufsbildung," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0059, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    12. Anette Haas & Michael Lucht & Norbert Schanne, 2012. "Why to employ both migrants and natives? A study on task-specific substitutability," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2012026, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
    13. Stöhr, Tobias, 2015. "The returns to occupational foreign language use: Evidence from Germany," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 86-98.
    14. Longhi, Simonetta, 2013. "Impact of cultural diversity on wages, evidence from panel data," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 43(5), pages 797-807.
    15. Bauer, Anja, 2013. "Mismatch unemployment : evidence from Germany 2000-2010," IAB Discussion Paper 201310, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    16. Warnke, Arne Jonas & Ederer, Peer & Schuller, Philipp, 2012. "Cognitive skills, tasks and job mobility," Annual Conference 2012 (Goettingen): New Approaches and Challenges for the Labor Market of the 21st Century 62026, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    17. Bachmann, Ronald & Bechara, Peggy & Vonnahme, Christina, 2017. "Occupational mobility in Europe: Extent, determinants and consequences," Ruhr Economic Papers 732, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
    18. Barbara Mueller & Juerg Schweri, 2012. "The returns to occupation-specific human capital - Evidence from mobility after training," Economics of Education Working Paper Series 0081, University of Zurich, Department of Business Administration (IBW).
    19. repec:dau:papers:123456789/14463 is not listed on IDEAS
    20. Natascha Nisic & Parvati Trübswetter, 2012. "Berufswechsler in Deutschland und Großbritannien," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 442, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    21. By Barbara Mueller & Jürg Schweri, 2015. "How specific is apprenticeship training? Evidence from inter-firm and occupational mobility after graduation," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(4), pages 1057-1077.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Job change Occupation change Britain Germany;

    JEL classification:

    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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