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Occupational change and mobility among employed and unemployed job seekers

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  • Longhi, Simonetta
  • Taylor, Mark P.

Abstract

We use data from the Labour Force Survey to show that employed and unemployed job seekers in Great Britain originate from different occupations and find jobs in different occupations. We find substantial differences in occupational mobility between job seekers: employed job seekers are most likely to move to occupations paying higher average wages relative to their previous occupation, while unemployed job seekers are most likely to move to lower paying occupations. Employed and unemployed job seekers exhibit different patterns of occupational mobility and, therefore, do not accept the same types of jobs.

Suggested Citation

  • Longhi, Simonetta & Taylor, Mark P., 2011. "Occupational change and mobility among employed and unemployed job seekers," ISER Working Paper Series 2011-25, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2011-25
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2011-25.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Francesca Sgobbi & Fátima Suleman, 2015. "The Value of Transferable Skills," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 62(4), pages 378-399, September.
    2. Reichelt, Malte & Abraham, Martin, 2015. "Occupational and regional mobility as substitutes : a new approach to understanding job changes and wage inequality," IAB Discussion Paper 201514, Institut für Arbeitsmarkt- und Berufsforschung (IAB), Nürnberg [Institute for Employment Research, Nuremberg, Germany].
    3. Carrillo-Tudela, Carlos & Hobijn, Bart & She, Powen & Visschers, Ludo, 2016. "The extent and cyclicality of career changes: Evidence for the U.K," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 18-41.
    4. Nagore García, Amparo & van Soest, Arthur, 2015. "New Job Matches and Their Stability Before and During the Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 9574, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Carlos Carrillo-Tudela & Bart Hobijn & Powen She & Ludo Visschers, 2014. "The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the UK (first version)," ESE Discussion Papers 246, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.

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