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Employed and unemployed job seekers: are they substitutes?

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  • Longhi, Simonetta
  • Taylor, Mark P.

Abstract

The job search literature suggests that an increase in the proportion of job seekers who are employed reduces the probability of unemployed people finding a job. However, there is little evidence indicating that employed and unemployed job seekers have similar observed characteristics or that they apply for the same jobs. We use the British Labour Force Survey to compare employed and unemployed job seekers, and find differences in their individual characteristics, preferences over working hours, and job search strategies which do not vary with the business cycle. We conclude that unemployed people do not directly compete with employed job seekers.

Suggested Citation

  • Longhi, Simonetta & Taylor, Mark P., 2010. "Employed and unemployed job seekers: are they substitutes?," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-09, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:ese:iserwp:2010-09
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    File URL: https://www.iser.essex.ac.uk/research/publications/working-papers/iser/2010-09.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Simonetta Longhi & Mark Taylor, 2013. "Occupational Change and Mobility Among Employed and Unemployed Job Seekers," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, pages 71-100.
    2. Longhi, Simonetta & Taylor, Mark P., 2011. "Explaining differences in job search outcomes between employed and unemployed job seekers," ISER Working Paper Series 2011-17, Institute for Social and Economic Research.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • J29 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Other
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General

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