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New Job Matches and their Stability before and during the Crisis

Author

Listed:
  • Nagore Garcia, A.
  • van Soest, Arthur

    (Tilburg University, Center For Economic Research)

Abstract

Using administrative data from the Spanish Social Security Administration, we analyse the nature and stability of job matches starting during the economic boom in 2005 and during the recession in 2009. We compare the individual, job and firm characteristics in the two samples and estimate a competing risk model distinguishing job-to-job, job-to-unemployment, and other transitions. We find that job-to-job transitions are pro-cyclical, while unemployment transitions are counter-cyclical. Individuals most affected by the economic crisis tend to be young males, living in regions with high unemployment rates, with low qualifications and working in manual occupations (particularly construction), and (especially Spanish speaking) immigrants. The positive relation between job stability and firm size is stronger during the recession than during the boom.

Suggested Citation

  • Nagore Garcia, A. & van Soest, Arthur, 2016. "New Job Matches and their Stability before and during the Crisis," Discussion Paper 2016-033, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:tiu:tiucen:3514fea2-6b69-40e2-bdcc-1ba81a96f0ca
    as

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    File URL: https://pure.uvt.nl/portal/files/12837467/2016_033.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Samuel Bentolila & J. Ignacio García-Pérez & Marcel Jansen, 2017. "Are the Spanish long-term unemployed unemployable?," SERIEs: Journal of the Spanish Economic Association, Springer;Spanish Economic Association, vol. 8(1), pages 1-41, March.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job tenure; business cycle; job-separations;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search
    • C41 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric and Statistical Methods: Special Topics - - - Duration Analysis; Optimal Timing Strategies
    • E32 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Prices, Business Fluctuations, and Cycles - - - Business Fluctuations; Cycles

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