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Women move differently: Job separations and gender

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  • Hirsch, Boris
  • Schnabel, Claus

Abstract

Using a large German linked employer-employee data set and methods of competing risks analysis, this paper investigates gender differences in job separation rates to employment and nonemployment. In line with descriptive evidence, we find lower job-to-job and higher job-to-nonemployment transition probabilities for women than men when controlling for individual and workplace characteristics and unobserved plant heterogeneity. These differences vanish once we allow these characteristics to affect separations differently by gender. When additionally controlling for wages, we find that both separation rates are considerably lower and also significantly less wage-elastic for women than for men.

Suggested Citation

  • Hirsch, Boris & Schnabel, Claus, 2010. "Women move differently: Job separations and gender," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 06/2010, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:iwqwdp:062010
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Hirsch, Boris & Mueller, Steffen, 2010. "Firm leadership and the gender pay gap: Do active owners discriminate more than hired managers?," Discussion Papers 72, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Chair of Labour and Regional Economics.
    2. Nagore García, Amparo & van Soest, Arthur, 2015. "New Job Matches and Their Stability Before and During the Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 9574, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Boris Hirsch & Michael Oberfichtner & Claus Schnabel, 2014. "The levelling effect of product market competition on gender wage discrimination," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-14, December.
    4. Barth, Erling & Pekkala Kerr, Sari & Olivetti, Claudia, 2017. "The Dynamics of Gender Earnings Differentials: Evidence from Establishment Data," IZA Discussion Papers 10974, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Değer Eryar & Hasan Tekgüç, 2014. "Gender Effect in Explaining Mobility Patterns in the Labor Market: A Case Study of Turkey," The Developing Economies, Institute of Developing Economies, vol. 52(4), pages 322-350, December.
    6. Hirsch, Boris & Schnabel, Claus, 2011. "Let's take bargaining models seriously: The decline in union power in Germany, 1992 - 2009," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 10/2011, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
    7. Schnitzlein, Daniel D., 2012. "How Important Is Cultural Background for the Level of Intergenerational Mobility?," EconStor Open Access Articles, ZBW - German National Library of Economics, pages 335-337.
    8. Eryar, Değer & Tekgüç, Hasan, 2013. "Gender effect in explaining the mobility patterns in the labor market: a Case study from Turkey," MPRA Paper 46006, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Tinkl, Fabian, 2010. "A note on Hadamard differentiability and differentiability in quadratic mean," FAU Discussion Papers in Economics 08/2010, Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg, Institute for Economics.
    10. Nagore Garcia, A. & van Soest, Arthur, 2016. "New Job Matches and their Stability before and during the Crisis," Discussion Paper 2016-033, Tilburg University, Center for Economic Research.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    job separations; gender; gender pay gap; Germany;

    JEL classification:

    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • J63 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Turnover; Vacancies; Layoffs
    • J16 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Gender; Non-labor Discrimination

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