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A Search Interpretation of Male-Female Wage Differentials

  • Bowlus, A.J.

A general equilibrium search framework is used to examine the role of gender differences in labor market behavior patterns (e.g., quit rates for personal reasons) in determining gender wage differentials. For samples of high school and college graduates from the National Longitudinal Survey of Youth (NLSY), these behavioral patterns are found to be significantly different across the sexes and account for 20-30 percent of the wage differentials. In particular, they play a key role in explaining the male-female wage differential that remains after controlling for the gender composition across occupations. Copyright 1997 by University of Chicago Press.

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Paper provided by University of Western Ontario, Department of Economics in its series UWO Department of Economics Working Papers with number 9504.

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Length: 37 pages
Date of creation: 1995
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:uwo:uwowop:9504
Contact details of provider: Postal:
Department of Economics, Reference Centre, Social Science Centre, University of Western Ontario, London, Ontario, Canada N6A 5C2

Phone: 519-661-2111 Ext.85244
Web page: http://economics.uwo.ca/research/research_papers/department_working_papers.html

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  1. Lazear, Edward P & Rosen, Sherwin, 1990. "Male-Female Wage Differentials in Job Ladders," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 8(1), pages S106-23, January.
  2. William F. Barnes & Ethel B. Jones, 1974. "Differences in Male and Female Quitting," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 9(4), pages 439-451.
  3. Jacob Mincer & Solomon Polacheck, 1974. "Family Investments in Human Capital: Earnings of Women," NBER Chapters, in: Economics of the Family: Marriage, Children, and Human Capital, pages 397-431 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  4. Paula England, 1982. "The Failure of Human Capital Theory to Explain Occupational Sex Segregation," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(3), pages 358-370.
  5. Francine D. Blau & Lawrence M. Kahn, 1981. "Race and Sex Differences in Quits by Young Workers," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 34(4), pages 563-577, July.
  6. James F. Ragan Jr. & Sharon P. Smith, 1981. "The Impact of Differences in Turnover Rates on Male/Female Pay Differentials," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 16(3), pages 343-365.
  7. Flinn, Christopher J & Heckman, James J, 1983. "Are Unemployment and Out of the Labor Force Behaviorally Distinct Labor Force States?," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 1(1), pages 28-42, January.
  8. Jacob Mincer & Haim Ofek, 1982. "Interrupted Work Careers: Depreciation and Restoration of Human Capital," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 17(1), pages 3-24.
  9. Light, Audrey Light & Ureta, Manuelita, 1990. "Gender Differences in Wages and Job Turnover among Continuously Employed Workers," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 80(2), pages 293-97, May.
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