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Job-to-Job Flows in the Great Recession

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  • Henry Hyatt
  • Erika McEntarfer

Abstract

We develop prototype job-to-job flow measures to provide new evidence on labor turnover and earnings dynamics in the Great Recession. We find a sharp drop in job mobility in the Great Recession, much sharper than the previous recession, and higher earnings penalties for job transitions with an intervening nonemployment spell. Focusing on residential construction separators in particular, we find increasing rates of industry change and higher earnings penalties from job change in the Great Recession.

Suggested Citation

  • Henry Hyatt & Erika McEntarfer, 2012. "Job-to-Job Flows in the Great Recession," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 102(3), pages 580-583, May.
  • Handle: RePEc:aea:aecrev:v:102:y:2012:i:3:p:580-83
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    File URL: http://www.aeaweb.org/articles.php?doi=10.1257/aer.102.3.580
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. John M. Abowd & Bryce E. Stephens & Lars Vilhuber & Fredrik Andersson & Kevin L. McKinney & Marc Roemer & Simon Woodcock, 2009. "The LEHD Infrastructure Files and the Creation of the Quarterly Workforce Indicators," NBER Chapters,in: Producer Dynamics: New Evidence from Micro Data, pages 149-230 National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
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    Cited by:

    1. Henry Hyatt & James Spletzer, 2013. "The recent decline in employment dynamics," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 2(1), pages 1-21, December.
    2. John Haltiwanger & Henry Hyatt & Erika McEntarfer, 2015. "Cyclical Reallocation of Workers Across Employers by Firm Size and Firm Wage," NBER Working Papers 21235, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    3. Henry R. Hyatt, 2015. "The decline in job-to-job flows," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 175-175.
    4. Nagore GarcĂ­a, Amparo & van Soest, Arthur, 2015. "New Job Matches and Their Stability Before and During the Crisis," IZA Discussion Papers 9574, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Daniel Martin & Olivier Pierrard, 2011. "On-the-job Search and Cyclical Unemployment: Crowding Out vs. Vacancy Effects," BCL working papers 64, Central Bank of Luxembourg.
    6. Martin, Daniel & Pierrard, Olivier, 2014. "On-the-job search and cyclical unemployment: Crowding out vs. vacancy effects," Journal of Economic Dynamics and Control, Elsevier, vol. 44(C), pages 235-250.
    7. Ammar Farooq & Adriana Kugler, 2015. "What factors contributed to changes in employment during and after the Great Recession?," IZA Journal of Labor Policy, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-28, December.
    8. Henry Hyatt & Erika McEntarfer & Kevin McKinney & Stephen Tibbets & Doug Walton, 2014. "JOB-TO-JOB (J2J) Flows: New Labor Market Statistics From Linked Employer-Employee Data," Working Papers 14-34, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.
    9. Henry Hyatt & Erika McEntarfer, 2012. "Job-to-Job Flows and the Business Cycle," Working Papers 12-04, Center for Economic Studies, U.S. Census Bureau.

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