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Accident Risk, Gender, Family Status and Occupational Choice in the UK

  • Grazier, Suzanne

    ()

    (Swansea University)

  • Sloane, Peter J.

    ()

    (Swansea University)

Many studies show that women are more risk averse than men. In this paper, following DeLeire and Levy (2004) for the US, we use family structure as a proxy for the degree of risk aversion to test the proposition that those with strong aversion to risk will make occupational choices biased towards safer jobs. In line with DeLeire and Levy we find that women are more risk averse than men and those married with children are more risk averse than those without. However, the effect on the degree of gender segregation is much smaller than for the US.

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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Discussion Papers with number 2302.

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Length: 40 pages
Date of creation: Sep 2006
Date of revision:
Publication status: published in: Labour Economics, 2008, 15(5), 938-957
Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp2302
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  1. Sarah Brown, Karl Taylor & Karl Taylor, 2004. "Wage Growth, Human Capital And Risk Preference," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2004 131, Royal Economic Society.
  2. Dohmen, Thomas J & Falk, Armin & Huffman, David & Schupp, Jürgen & Sunde, Uwe & Wagner, Gert Georg, 2006. "Individual Risk Attitudes: New Evidence from a Large, Representative, Experimentally-Validated Survey," CEPR Discussion Papers 5517, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  3. Dolton, Peter J & Kidd, Michael P, 1994. "Occupational Access and Wage Discrimination," Oxford Bulletin of Economics and Statistics, Department of Economics, University of Oxford, vol. 56(4), pages 457-74, November.
  4. Sandy, Robert & R. F. Elliot & W. S. Siebert & X. D. Wei, 2001. " Measurement Error and the Effects of Unions on the Compensating Differentials for Fatal Workplace Risks," Journal of Risk and Uncertainty, Springer, vol. 23(1), pages 33-56, July.
  5. Thomas DeLeire & Helen Levy, 2004. "Worker Sorting and the Risk of Death on the Job," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 22(4), pages 925-954, October.
  6. D. McFadden & J. Hausman, 1981. "Specification Tests for the Multinominal Logit Model," Working papers 292, Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Department of Economics.
  7. Xiangdong Wei & Steve Russell & Robert Sandy, 2005. "Analysing workplace safety policies in hong kong with a simulation method," International Economic Journal, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 19(2), pages 321-353.
  8. Nabanita Datta Gupta & Anders Poulsen & Marie-Claire Villeval, 2005. "Male and Female Competitive Behavior - Experimental Evidence," Post-Print halshs-00180022, HAL.
  9. Ekelund, Jesper & Johansson, Edvard & Jarvelin, Marjo-Riitta & Lichtermann, Dirk, 2005. "Self-employment and risk aversion--evidence from psychological test data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(5), pages 649-659, October.
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