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Which club should I attend, Dad?: Targeted socialization and production

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  • Albornoz-Crespo, Facundo
  • Cabrales, Antonio
  • Hauk, Esther

Abstract

We study a model that integrates productive and socialization efforts with network choice and parental investments. We characterize the unique symmetric equilibrium of this game. We first show that individuals underinvest in productive and social effort, but that solving only the investment problem can exacerbate the misallocations due to network choice, to the point that it may generate an even lower social welfare if one of the networks is sufficiently disadvantaged. We also study the interaction of parental investment with network choice. We relate these equilibrium results with characteristics that we find in the data on economic co-authorship and field transmission between advisors and advisees.

Suggested Citation

  • Albornoz-Crespo, Facundo & Cabrales, Antonio & Hauk, Esther, 2014. "Which club should I attend, Dad?: Targeted socialization and production," CEPR Discussion Papers 10321, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
  • Handle: RePEc:cpr:ceprdp:10321
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Bodo Knoll & Nadine Riedel & Eva Schlenker, 2017. "He's a Chip Off the Old Block — The Persistence of Occupational Choices Across Generations," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 31(2), pages 174-203, June.
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    5. Albornoz-Crespo, Facundo & Berlinski, Samuel & Cabrales, Antonio, 2010. "Incentives, resources and the organization of the school system," CEPR Discussion Papers 7964, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    6. Jean-Paul Carvalho, 2009. "A Theory of the Islamic Revival," Economics Series Working Papers 424, University of Oxford, Department of Economics.
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    10. Enrico Moretti, 2004. "Workers' Education, Spillovers, and Productivity: Evidence from Plant-Level Production Functions," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 94(3), pages 656-690, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Yannis Ioannides, 2015. "Endogenous Social Networks and Inequality in an Intergenerational Setting," Working Papers 2015-012, Human Capital and Economic Opportunity Working Group.
    2. Albornoz, Facundo & Cabrales, Antonio & Hauk, Esther, 2016. "Targeted socialization and production," CRETA Online Discussion Paper Series 23, Centre for Research in Economic Theory and its Applications CRETA.
    3. Daniel Albalate & Germá Bel, 2015. "La experiencia internacional en alta velocidad ferroviaria," Working Papers 2015-02, FEDEA.
    4. Gradstein, Mark & Justman, Moshe, 2018. "Diversity and Growth," IZA Discussion Papers 11553, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Del Bello, Carlo & Panebianco, Fabrizio & Verdier, Thierry & Zenou, Yves, 2016. "Cultural Transmission and Socialization Spillovers in Education," CEPR Discussion Papers 11419, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    cultural identity; immigrant sorting; network formation; parental involvement; peer effects;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • I28 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Government Policy
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers

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