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On the Cultural Transmission of Corruption

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  • Hauk, Esther
  • Saez-Marti, Maria

Abstract

We provide a cultural explanation to the phenomenon of corruption in the framework of an overlapping generations model with intergenerational transmission of values. We show that under reasonable parameters the economy has two steady states which differ in their levels of corruption. The driving force in the equilibrium se1ection process is the education effort exerted by parents which depends on the initial distribution of ethics in the population and on expectations about policies in the future. We propose sorne policy interventions which via parents' efforts have long lasting effects on corruption and show the success of intensive education campaigns. We argue that our model exp1ains the differecnes which are observed across countries with similar degrees of economic development and that educating the young is a key element in reducing corruption successfully.
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Suggested Citation

  • Hauk, Esther & Saez-Marti, Maria, 2002. "On the Cultural Transmission of Corruption," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 107(2), pages 311-335, December.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:jetheo:v:107:y:2002:i:2:p:311-335
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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D10 - Microeconomics - - Household Behavior - - - General
    • J13 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Fertility; Family Planning; Child Care; Children; Youth

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