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Inequalities in adolescent learning: Does the timing and persistence of food insecurity at home matter?

Author

Listed:
  • Elisabetta Aurino

    (Imperial College London, UK)

  • Jasmine Fledderjohann

    (Lancaster University, UK)

  • Sukumar Vellakkal

    (BITS Pilano, India)

Abstract

We investigated inequalities in learning achievements at 12 years by household food insecurity trajectories at ages 5, 8 and 12 years in a longitudinal sample of 1,911 Indian children. Estimates included extensive child and household controls, and lagged cognitive scores to address unobserved individual heterogeneity in ability and early investments. Overall, household food insecurity at any age predicted lower vocabulary, reading, maths and English scores in early adolescence. Adolescents from households that transitioned out from food insecurity at age 5 to later food security, and adolescents from chronically food insecure households had the lowest scores across all outcomes. There was heterogeneity in the relationship between temporal occurrence of food insecurity and cognitive skills, based on developmental and curriculum-specific timing of skill formation. Results were robust to additional explanations of the “household food insecurity gap”, i.e. education and health investments, parental and child education aspirations, and child psychosocial skills.

Suggested Citation

  • Elisabetta Aurino & Jasmine Fledderjohann & Sukumar Vellakkal, 2018. "Inequalities in adolescent learning: Does the timing and persistence of food insecurity at home matter?," Working Papers 2018: 09, Department of Economics, University of Venice "Ca' Foscari".
  • Handle: RePEc:ven:wpaper:2018:09
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    3. Rajshri Jayaraman & Tanika Chakraborty, 2016. "School Feeding and Learning Achievement: Evidence from India’s Midday Meal Program," Working Papers id:11269, eSocialSciences.
    4. Chakraborty, Tanika & Jayaraman, Rajshri, 2016. "School Feeding and Learning Achievement: Evidence from India's Midday Meal Program," IZA Discussion Papers 10086, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
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    6. Tanika Chakraborty & Rajshri Jayaraman, 2016. "School Feeding and Learning Achievement: Evidence from India's Midday Meal Program," CESifo Working Paper Series 5994, CESifo.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    Cited by:

    1. Bhuyan, Biswabhusan & Sahoo, Bimal Kishore & Suar, Damodar, 2020. "Nutritional status, poverty, and relative deprivation among socio-economic and gender groups in India: Is the growth inclusive?," World Development Perspectives, Elsevier, vol. 18(C).
    2. Elisabetta Aurino & Whitney Schott & Jere R. Behrman & Mary Penny, 2019. "Nutritional Status from 1 to 15 Years and Adolescent Learning for Boys and Girls in Ethiopia, India, Peru, and Vietnam," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 38(6), pages 899-931, December.
    3. Muzna Alvi & Manavi Gupta, 0. "Learning in times of lockdown: how Covid-19 is affecting education and food security in India," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 0, pages 1-4.
    4. Elisabetta Aurino & Sharon Wolf & Edward Tsinigo, 2020. "Household food insecurity and early childhood development: Longitudinal evidence from Ghana," PLOS ONE, Public Library of Science, vol. 15(4), pages 1-19, April.
    5. Muzna Alvi & Manavi Gupta, 2020. "Learning in times of lockdown: how Covid-19 is affecting education and food security in India," Food Security: The Science, Sociology and Economics of Food Production and Access to Food, Springer;The International Society for Plant Pathology, vol. 12(4), pages 793-796, August.

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Cognitive skills; Learning; Adolescent; Food insecurity; India; Education inequality; Human capital; Longitudinal; Education; Lifecourse;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • I29 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Other
    • I39 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - Other
    • H52 - Public Economics - - National Government Expenditures and Related Policies - - - Government Expenditures and Education

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