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Can Non-Cognitive Skills Programs Improve Achievement? Quasi-Experimental Evidence from EPIS

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  • Martins, Pedro S.

Abstract

Do investments in soft skills pay off in terms of student achievement? This paper evaluates a large private-sector program in this area, EPIS, based on individual and small-group sessions of mediators that seek to improve the non-cognitive skills (e.g. motivation, self-esteem, conscientiousness) of selected students. Our quasi-experimental evidence is drawn from rich longitudinal student data and the different timings of the roll-out of the program, within and across schools. The results highlight the potential of targeted, small-group, non-cognitive interventions, as we find that the EPIS program reduced grade retention by at least 10 percentage points and did so in a cost-effective manner.

Suggested Citation

  • Martins, Pedro S., 2017. "Can Non-Cognitive Skills Programs Improve Achievement? Quasi-Experimental Evidence from EPIS," GLO Discussion Paper Series 105, Global Labor Organization (GLO).
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:glodps:105
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. Martins, Pedro S., 2017. "(How) Do Non-Cognitive Skills Programs Improve Adolescent School Achievement? Experimental Evidence," IZA Discussion Papers 10950, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Student achievement; Non-cognitive skills; Matched School-Student Data;

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J08 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - General - - - Labor Economics Policies

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