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(How) Do Non-Cognitive Skills Programs Improve Adolescent School Achievement? Experimental Evidence

Listed author(s):
  • Pedro S. Martins

Non-cognitive skills programs may be an important policy option to improve the academic outcomes of adolescents. In this paper, we evaluate experimentally the EPIS program, which is based on relatively short bi-weekly individual or small-group non-cognitive mediation meetings with students selected based on their low school achievement. Our RCT estimates, covering nearly 3,000 7th- and 8th-grade students across over 50 schools and two years, indicate that the program increases the probability of progression by 11\% to 22\%. The effects are stronger amongst older students, girls, and in language subjects, and when the program mediator is of the same gender as the student.

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File URL: http://webspace.qmul.ac.uk/pmartins/CGRWP81.pdf
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Paper provided by Queen Mary, University of London, School of Business and Management, Centre for Globalisation Research in its series Working Papers with number 81.

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Date of creation: Apr 2017
Handle: RePEc:cgs:wpaper:81
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