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Quantifying Reduced-Form Evidence on Collateral Constraints

Author

Listed:
  • Sylvain Catherine
  • Thomas Chaney

    (Département d'économie)

  • Zongbo Huang

    (Chinese University of Hong Kong (CUHK))

  • David Sraer

    (Princeton University)

  • David Thesmar

    (Sloan School of Management (MIT Sloan))

Abstract

While a mature literature shows that credit constraints causally affect firm level investment, this literature provides little guidance to quantify the economic effects implied by these findings. Our paper attempts to fill this gap in two ways. First, we use a structural model of firm dynamics with collateral constraints, and estimate the model to match the firm-level sensitivity of investment to collateral values. We estimate that firms can only pledge about 19% of their collateral value. Second, we embed this model in a general equilibrium framework and estimate that, relative to first-best, collateral constraints are responsible for 11% output losses.

Suggested Citation

  • Sylvain Catherine & Thomas Chaney & Zongbo Huang & David Sraer & David Thesmar, 2018. "Quantifying Reduced-Form Evidence on Collateral Constraints," Sciences Po Economics Discussion Papers info:hdl:2441/5e3g19l1fn9, Sciences Po Departement of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:spo:wpecon:info:hdl:2441/5e3g19l1fn9thpq7ldd8kqr3vu
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. James Cloyne & Clodomiro Ferreira & Maren Froemel & Paolo Surico, 2018. "Monetary Policy, Corporate Finance and Investment," NBER Working Papers 25366, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
    2. In Hwan Jo & Tatsuro Senga, 2019. "Aggregate Consequences of Credit Subsidy Policies: Firm Dynamics and Misallocation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 32, pages 68-93, April.
    3. In Hwan Jo & Tatsuro Senga, 2019. "Aggregate Consequences of Credit Subsidy Policies: Firm Dynamics and Misallocation," Review of Economic Dynamics, Elsevier for the Society for Economic Dynamics, vol. 32, pages 68-93, April.

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