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Sources of TFP Growth: Occupational Choice and Financial Deepening

  • Hyeok Jeong
  • Robert M. Townsend

We develop a method of growth accounting based on the integrated use of transitional growth models and micro data. We decompose total factor productivity (TFP) growth into the occupational-shift effect, financial-deepening effect, capital-heterogeneity effect, and sectoral-Solow-residuals. Applying this method to Thailand, which experienced rapid growth with enormous structural changes between 1976 and 1996, we find that 73 percent of TFP growth is explained by occupational shifts and ?nancial deepening, without presuming exogenous technical progress. Expansion of credit is a major part. We also show the role of endogenous interaction between factor price dynamics and the wealth distribution for TFP.

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Paper provided by Institute of Economic Policy Research (IEPR) in its series IEPR Working Papers with number 05.28.

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Length: 32 pages
Date of creation: Mar 2005
Date of revision: May 2005
Publication status: Published in Review of Economics, March 1999, pages 1-23
Handle: RePEc:scp:wpaper:05-28
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  12. Jeong, Hyeok, 2008. "Assessment Of Relationship Between Growth And Inequality: Micro Evidence From Thailand," Macroeconomic Dynamics, Cambridge University Press, vol. 12(S2), pages 155-197, September.
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  18. Raphael Bergoeing & Patrick J. Kehoe & Timothy J. Kehoe & Raimundo Soto, 2002. "Decades lost and found: Mexico and Chile since 1980," Quarterly Review, Federal Reserve Bank of Minneapolis, issue Win, pages 3-30.
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  25. Chang-Tai Hsieh, 2002. "What Explains the Industrial Revolution in East Asia? Evidence From the Factor Markets," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 92(3), pages 502-526, June.
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