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Employment and the collateral channel of monetary policy

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  • Bahaj, Saleem Abubakr
  • Foulis, Angus
  • Pinter, Gabor
  • Surico, Paolo

Abstract

This paper uses a detailed firm-level dataset to show that monetary policy propagates via asset prices through corporate debt collateralised on real estate. Our research design exploits the fact that many small and medium sized firms use the homes of the firm’s directors as a key source of collateral, and directors’ homes are typically not in the same region as their firm. This spatial separation of firms and firms’ collateral allows us to separate the propagation of monetary policy via fluctuations in collateral values from that via demand channels. We find that younger and more levered firms who have collateral values that are particularly sensitive to monetary policy show the largest employment response to monetary policy. The collateral channel explains a sizeable share of the aggregate employment response.

Suggested Citation

  • Bahaj, Saleem Abubakr & Foulis, Angus & Pinter, Gabor & Surico, Paolo, 2018. "Employment and the collateral channel of monetary policy," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 100934, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
  • Handle: RePEc:ehl:lserod:100934
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    File URL: http://eprints.lse.ac.uk/100934/
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    Cited by:

    1. Leonardo Gambacorta & Yiping Huang & Zhenhua Li & Han Qiu & Shu Chen, 2020. "Data vs collateral," BIS Working Papers 881, Bank for International Settlements.
    2. Balleer, Almut & Zorn, Peter, 2019. "Monetary Policy, Price Setting, and Credit Constraints," CEPR Discussion Papers 14163, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    3. Balleer, Almut & Zorn, Peter, 2020. "The Micro-level Price Response to Monetary Policy," VfS Annual Conference 2020 (Virtual Conference): Gender Economics 224557, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    4. Ferrando, Annalisa & Vermeulen, Philip & Durante, Elena, 2020. "Monetary policy, investment and firm heterogeneity," Working Paper Series 2390, European Central Bank.
    5. Czech, Robert & Pintér, Gábor, 2020. "Informed trading and the dynamics of client-dealer connections in corporate bond markets," Bank of England working papers 895, Bank of England.
    6. Gareth Anderson & Ambrogio Cesa-Bianchi, 2020. "Crossing the Credit Channel: Credit Spreads and Firm Heterogeneity," Discussion Papers 2005, Centre for Macroeconomics (CFM).

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    JEL classification:

    • J1 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics

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