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The impact of the London bombings on the wellbeing of young Muslims

Author

Listed:
  • Arne Risa Hole

    () (Department of Economics, University of Sheffield)

  • Anita Ratcliffe

    () (Department of Economics, University of Sheffield)

Abstract

This paper uses the timing of the London bombings, occurring midway through a nationally representative survey of English adolescents, to identify the impact of an exogenous shock to racism on the wellbeing of young Muslims. We extend Lechner (2011) to apply the method of difference-in-differences to ordered response data. Difference-in-differences using non-Muslim adolescents as controls, and a before-after comparison across Muslims alone, both show a decline in the wellbeing of Muslim teenage girls after the bombings, particularly for those facing high levels of deprivation and segregation. No corresponding effects are found among Muslim teenage boys.

Suggested Citation

  • Arne Risa Hole & Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "The impact of the London bombings on the wellbeing of young Muslims," Working Papers 2015002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  • Handle: RePEc:shf:wpaper:2015002
    as

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    File URL: http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/economics/research/serps/articles/2015_002
    File Function: First version, January 2015
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Racism; Wellbeing; Difference-in-differences; Ordered Response Models;

    JEL classification:

    • I10 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Health - - - General
    • I31 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Welfare, Well-Being, and Poverty - - - General Welfare, Well-Being
    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination

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