IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/uwp/jhriss/v49y2014iii1p540-57.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

The FDA and ABCs: Unintended Consequences of Antidepressant Warnings on Human Capital

Author

Listed:
  • Susan H. Busch
  • Ezra Golberstein
  • Ellen Meara

Abstract

Using annual cross-sectional data on over 100,000 adolescents aged 12–17, we studied academic and behavioral outcomes among those who were and were not likely affected by FDA warnings regarding the safety of antidepressants. Compared to other adolescents, adolescents with probable depression experienced a relative decline in grade point average of 0.14 points following the FDA warnings. The FDA warnings also coincided with increased delinquency, use of tobacco, and use of illicit drugs. Together, our results stress the importance of mental health and its treatment as an input into cognitive and noncognitive aspects of human capital.

Suggested Citation

  • Susan H. Busch & Ezra Golberstein & Ellen Meara, 2014. "The FDA and ABCs: Unintended Consequences of Antidepressant Warnings on Human Capital," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 49(3), pages 540-557.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:49:y:2014:iii:1:p:540-57
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://jhr.uwpress.org/cgi/reprint/49/3/540
    Download Restriction: A subscripton is required to access pdf files. Pay per article is available.

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Dave E. Marcotte & Sara Markowitz, 2011. "A cure for crime? Psycho‐pharmaceuticals and crime trends," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 30(1), pages 29-56, December.
    2. Ding, Weili & Lehrer, Steven F. & Rosenquist, J.Niels & Audrain-McGovern, Janet, 2009. "The impact of poor health on academic performance: New evidence using genetic markers," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 28(3), pages 578-597, May.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Cornaglia, Francesca & Crivellaro, Elena & McNally, Sandra, 2015. "Mental health and education decisions," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 33(C), pages 1-12.
    2. Arne Risa Hole & Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "The impact of the London bombings on the wellbeing of young Muslims," Working Papers 2015002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:49:y:2014:iii:1:p:540-57. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (). General contact details of provider: http://jhr.uwpress.org/ .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.