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Accounting for Intergenerational Social Immobility in Low- and Middle-Income Countries

Author

Listed:
  • Fabian Koenings

    (Friedrich Schiller University Jena)

  • Jakob Schwab

    (German Development Institute)

Abstract

This study investigates the transmission channels of intergenerational social immobility in developing countries. From rich longitudinal data elicited throughout children's childhood and youth, we extract latent factors of their development process. These factors comprise individual attributes as well as characteristics of children's environments. We decompose social immobility by analyzing the extent to which the different factors mediate the link between the socioeconomic statuses of parents and children. The findings indicate that relevant factors for the intergenerational transmission of socioeconomic status in developed countries - such as children's cognitive skills and aspirations - are also important in developing countries. Moreover, we confirm conjecture about the role of transmission channels that are specific to the developing country context, namely starting a family while underage and having to perform child labor. Other factors - most notably various non-cognitive skills - play no role.

Suggested Citation

  • Fabian Koenings & Jakob Schwab, 2020. "Accounting for Intergenerational Social Immobility in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," Jena Economic Research Papers 2020-008, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena, revised 12 Mar 2021.
  • Handle: RePEc:jrp:jrpwrp:2020-008
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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. Jo Blanden & Robert Haveman & Timothy Smeeding & Kathryn Wilson, 2014. "Intergenerational Mobility in the United States and Great Britain: A Comparative Study of Parent–Child Pathways," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 60(3), pages 425-449, September.
    2. Elisabetta Aurino & Francesco Burchi, 2017. "Children’s Multidimensional Health and Medium-Term Cognitive Skills in Low- and Middle-Income Countries," The European Journal of Development Research, Palgrave Macmillan;European Association of Development Research and Training Institutes (EADI), vol. 29(2), pages 289-311, April.
    3. A. Colin Cameron & Douglas L. Miller, 2015. "A Practitioner’s Guide to Cluster-Robust Inference," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 50(2), pages 317-372.
    4. Agupusi, Patricia, 2019. "The effect of parents’ education appreciation on intergenerational inequality," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 214-222.
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Intergenerational social mobility; transmission mechanisms; low- and middle-income countries; decomposition; mediation analysis; factor analysis;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I24 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - Education and Inequality
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration

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