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Intergenerational Social Mobility

Author

Listed:
  • Orsetta Causa

    (OECD)

  • Åsa Johansson

    (OECD)

Abstract

This paper assesses recent patterns in intergenerational social mobility across OECD countries and examines the role that public policies can play in affecting such mobility. It shows that the relationship between parental or socio-economic background and offspring’s educational and wage outcomes is positive and significant in practically all countries for which evidence is available. Intergenerational social mobility is measured by several different indicators since no single indicator provides a complete picture. However, one pattern that emerges is of a group of countries, e.g. southern European countries and Luxembourg, which appears to rank as relatively immobile on most indicators, while another group, e.g. Nordics, is found to be more mobile. Furthermore, public policies such as education and early childcare play a role in explaining observed differences in intergenerational social mobility across countries. In addition, this study also finds a positive cross-country correlation between intergenerational social mobility and redistributive policies. Mobilité sociale intergénérationnelle Cet article examine les tendances récentes de la mobilité sociale intergénérationnelle dans les pays de l’OCDE et analyse rôle joué dans ce contexte par les politiques publiques. On observe, dans la quasitotalité des pays pour lesquels les données sont disponibles, une relation positive et significative entre l’origine sociale et familiale et le niveau d’éducation et/ou de salaire d’un individu. La mobilité sociale intergénérationnelle est ici mesurée au travers d’une batterie d’indicateurs, parce qu’il n’existe pas d’indicateur unique permettant d’apprécier les phénomènes de persistance entre générations. Néanmoins l’analyse met clairement en évidence l’existence de deux groupes de pays: d’un coté les pays du Sud de l’Europe et le Luxembourg, où l’on mesure une faiblesse relative de la mobilité sociale intergénérationnelle, et ce quel que soit l’indicateur utilisé, et de l’autre les pays Nordiques, où l’on mesure une réalité inverse. De plus, l’article montre que certaines politiques, telles que les politiques éducatives et scolaires ou les politiques liées à la petite enfance, peuvent affecter la mobilité sociale entre générations. L’analyse empirique met également en évidence une association positive entre les politiques de redistribution du revenu et la mobilité sociale intergénérationnelle.

Suggested Citation

  • Orsetta Causa & Åsa Johansson, 2009. "Intergenerational Social Mobility," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 707, OECD Publishing.
  • Handle: RePEc:oec:ecoaaa:707-en
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1787/223106258208
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    Cited by:

    1. Henrekson, Magnus & Lyssarides, Odd, 2016. "The Social Background of Elite Executives: The Swedish Case," Working Paper Series 1138, Research Institute of Industrial Economics.
    2. Joachim Frick & Kristina Krell, 2011. "Einkommensmessungen in Haushaltspanelstudien für Deutschland: Ein Vergleich von EU-SILC und SOEP," AStA Wirtschafts- und Sozialstatistisches Archiv, Springer;Deutsche Statistische Gesellschaft - German Statistical Society, vol. 5(3), pages 221-248, December.
    3. Jean-Marc Fournier & Åsa Johansson, 2016. "The Effect of the Size and the Mix of Public Spending on Growth and Inequality," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1344, OECD Publishing.
    4. Gunther Tichy, 2015. "Protecting social inclusion and mobility in a low growth scenario," WWWforEurope Working Papers series 100, WWWforEurope.
    5. Bjørnskov, Christian & Dreher, Axel & Fischer, Justina A.V. & Schnellenbach, Jan & Gehring, Kai, 2013. "Inequality and happiness: When perceived social mobility and economic reality do not match," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 91(C), pages 75-92.
    6. repec:spr:italej:v:3:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1007_s40797-017-0053-3 is not listed on IDEAS
    7. Francesco Vona, 2011. "Does the Expansion of Higher Education Reduce Educational Inequality? Evidence from 12 European Countries," Documents de Travail de l'OFCE 2011-12, Observatoire Francais des Conjonctures Economiques (OFCE).
    8. Tansel, Aysit, 2011. "Intergenerational educational mobility in Turkey," MPRA Paper 68435, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Giovanni D'Alessio, 2012. "Wealth and inequality in Italy," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 115, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    10. Brian Nolan & Gosta Esping-Andersen & Christopher T. Whelan & Bertrand Maitre, 2010. "The Role of Social Institutions in Inter-Generational Mobility," Working Papers 201018, Geary Institute, University College Dublin.
    11. Orsetta Causa & Alain de Serres & Nicolas Ruiz, 2015. "Structural reforms and income distribution," OECD Economic Policy Papers 13, OECD Publishing.
    12. Barbara Ermini & Luca Papi & Francesca Scaturro, 2016. "Over-education among italian Ph.D. graduates. Does the crisis make a difference?," Mo.Fi.R. Working Papers 126, Money and Finance Research group (Mo.Fi.R.) - Univ. Politecnica Marche - Dept. Economic and Social Sciences.
    13. Boris Cournède & Antoine Goujard & Álvaro Pina, 2013. "How to Achieve Growth- and Equity-friendly Fiscal Consolidation?: A Proposed Methodology for Instrument Choice with an Illustrative Application to OECD Countries," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1088, OECD Publishing.
    14. Christian Daude & Virginia Robano, 2015. "On intergenerational (im)mobility in Latin America," Latin American Economic Review, Springer;Centro de Investigaciòn y Docencia Económica (CIDE), vol. 24(1), pages 1-29, December.
    15. Ayca Akarcay-Gurbuz & Sezgin Polat, 2015. "The rocky road to post-compulsory education in Turkey: Intergenerational educational mobility," Koç University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum Working Papers 1510, Koc University-TUSIAD Economic Research Forum.
    16. Åsa Johansson, 2016. "Public Finance, Economic Growth and Inequality: A Survey of the Evidence," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 1346, OECD Publishing.
    17. Nicola Brandt, 2012. "Reducing Poverty in Chile: Cash Transfers and Better Jobs," OECD Economics Department Working Papers 951, OECD Publishing.
    18. Borisov, Gleb V. & Pissarides, Christopher A., 2016. "The Intergenerational Transmission of Human Capital and Earnings in Contemporary Russia," IZA Discussion Papers 10300, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    19. Driouchi, Ahmed & Gamar, Alae, 2016. "The Gap between Educational & Social Intergenerational Mobility in Arab Countries," MPRA Paper 73998, University Library of Munich, Germany.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    education; intergenerational education mobility; intergenerational wage mobility; mobilité sociale intergénérationnelle de l'éducation; mobilité sociale intergénérationnelle des salariés; politique publique; public policy; éducation;

    JEL classification:

    • C20 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - General
    • C21 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Cross-Sectional Models; Spatial Models; Treatment Effect Models
    • H23 - Public Economics - - Taxation, Subsidies, and Revenue - - - Externalities; Redistributive Effects; Environmental Taxes and Subsidies
    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J60 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - General
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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