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Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Rural Economy: Evidence from Nepal and Vietnam

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  • M. Shahe Emran
  • Forhad Shilpi

Abstract

This paper presents evidence on intergenerational occupational mobility from agriculture to the nonfarm sector using survey data from Nepal and Vietnam. In the absence of credible instruments, the degree of selection on observables is used as a guide to the degree of selection on unobservables, à la Altonji et al. (2005) to address the unobserved genetic correlations. The results show that intergenerational occupational mobility is lower among women in both countries, and is lower in Nepal compared with Vietnam. In the case of Nepal, strong evidence favors a causal role played by the mother’s nonfarm participation in the daughter’s occupation choice, possibly because of cultural inheritance in a traditional society.

Suggested Citation

  • M. Shahe Emran & Forhad Shilpi, 2011. "Intergenerational Occupational Mobility in Rural Economy: Evidence from Nepal and Vietnam," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 46(2), pages 427-458.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:46:y:2011:ii:1:p:427-458
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    Cited by:

    1. Emran, M. Shahe & Shilpi, Forhad, 2015. "Gender, Geography, and Generations: Intergenerational Educational Mobility in Post-Reform India," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 72(C), pages 362-380.
    2. Nguyen, Cuong & Nguyen, Lam, 2017. "Intra-generational and intergenerational mobility in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 80083, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    3. Thomas Bossuroy & Denis Cogneau, 2013. "Social Mobility in Five African Countries," Review of Income and Wealth, International Association for Research in Income and Wealth, vol. 59, pages 84-110, October.
    4. Doan, Quang Hung & Nguyen, Ngoc Anh, 2016. "Intergenerational Income Mobility in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 70603, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    5. Hoang, Trung X. & Pham, Cong S. & Ulubaşoğlu, Mehmet A., 2014. "Non-Farm Activity, Household Expenditure, and Poverty Reduction in Rural Vietnam: 2002–2008," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 554-568.
    6. Eduardo Rodrigues-Oreggia & Samuel Freije, 2012. "Long term impact of a Cash-Transfers Program on Labor Outcomes of the Rural Youth," CID Working Papers 230, Center for International Development at Harvard University.
    7. M. Shahe, Emran & Asadul, Islam & Forhad, Shilpi, 2018. "Distributional Effects of Corruption When Enforcement is Biased: Theory and Evidence from Bribery in Schools in Bangladesh," MPRA Paper 84637, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    8. Emran, M. Shahe & Shilpi, Forhad, 2017. "Estimating Intergenerational Mobility with Incomplete Data: Coresidency and Truncation Bias in Rank-Based Relative and Absolute Mobility Measures," MPRA Paper 80724, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. Dang, Thang, 2015. "Intergenerational mobility of earnings and income among sons and daughters in Vietnam," MPRA Paper 75357, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    10. Emran, M. Shahe & Greene, William H & Shilpi, Forhad, 2015. "When measure matters: coresident sample selection bias in estimating intergenerational mobility in developing countries," MPRA Paper 65920, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    11. Emran,M. Shahe & Greene,William & Shilpi,Forhad J., 2016. "When measure matters: coresidency, truncation bias, and intergenerational mobility in developing countries," Policy Research Working Paper Series 7608, The World Bank.
    12. Emran, M. Shahe & Sun, Yan, 2014. "Are the Children of Uneducated Farmers Doubly Doomed? Farm, Nonfarm and Intergenerational Educational Mobility in Rural China," MPRA Paper 59230, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    13. Gabriela Aparicio & Paul E. Carrillo & M. Shahe Emran, 2013. "Are Sunday Babies Doomed for Life? Measuring the Sunday-Born Achievement Gap in Ecuador," Working Papers 2013-2, The George Washington University, Institute for International Economic Policy.

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