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Parental Education and Wages: Evidence from China

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  • Chen, Yuanyuan

    () (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics)

  • Feng, Shuaizhang

    () (Shanghai University of Finance and Economics)

Abstract

Using nationally representative data in China, we find substantial positive partial correlations of both parents' education with one's wage. In addition, returns to father's education are higher in more monopsonistic and less meritocratic labor markets, including non-coastal regions, the state-owned sector, and the early periods of the reform era. The opposite is, however, true with respect to mother's education. Overall, the empirical evidence is consistent with the story that father's education mainly indicates family connections useful for locating a better-paying first job, while mother's education primarily captures unmeasured ability.

Suggested Citation

  • Chen, Yuanyuan & Feng, Shuaizhang, 2009. "Parental Education and Wages: Evidence from China," IZA Discussion Papers 4218, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  • Handle: RePEc:iza:izadps:dp4218
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    Cited by:

    1. Zhang, Yingqiang & Eriksson, Tor, 2010. "Inequality of opportunity and income inequality in nine Chinese provinces, 1989-2006," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 21(4), pages 607-616, December.
    2. repec:gam:jsusta:v:10:y:2018:i:7:p:2373-:d:156875 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Vinish Shrestha & Rashesh Shrestha, 2017. "Intergenerational effect of education reform: mother's education and children's human capital in Nepal," Working Papers 2017-05, Towson University, Department of Economics, revised Oct 2017.
    4. Kind, Michael, 2015. "Start me up: How fathers' unemployment affects their sons' school-to-work transitions," Ruhr Economic Papers 583, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    family connections; wages; parental education; unmeasured ability;

    JEL classification:

    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J62 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Job, Occupational and Intergenerational Mobility; Promotion

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