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SFamily Background and the Estimated Return to Schooling: Swedish Evidenc

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  • Sveinn Agnarsson
  • Paul S. Carlin

Abstract

Earnings regressions for married and cohabiting Swedish males in 1993 indicate that controlling for family background reduces the measured return to education by about 9 percent, net of measurement error bias. The Swedish evidence is generally consistent with the hypothesis that family background effects are primarily a result of an efficient marital sorting mechanism, which provides a signal about unobservable traits rather than being an indicator of nepotism.

Suggested Citation

  • Sveinn Agnarsson & Paul S. Carlin, 2002. "SFamily Background and the Estimated Return to Schooling: Swedish Evidenc," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(3), pages 680-692.
  • Handle: RePEc:uwp:jhriss:v:37:y:2002:i:3:p:680-692
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    Cited by:

    1. Michele Raitano & Francesco Vona, 2015. "Measuring the link between intergenerational occupational mobility and earnings: evidence from eight European countries," The Journal of Economic Inequality, Springer;Society for the Study of Economic Inequality, vol. 13(1), pages 83-102, March.
    2. Tushar Agrawal, 2011. "Returns to education in India: Some recent evidence," Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai Working Papers 2011-017, Indira Gandhi Institute of Development Research, Mumbai, India.
    3. Tracy L. Regan & Ronald L. Oaxaca & Galen Burghardt, 2007. "A Human Capital Model Of The Effects Of Ability And Family Background On Optimal Schooling Levels," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 45(4), pages 721-738, October.
    4. Chen, Yuanyuan & Feng, Shuaizhang, 2009. "Parental Education and Wages: Evidence from China," IZA Discussion Papers 4218, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Yuanyuan Chen & Shuaizhang Feng, 2011. "Parental education and wages: Evidence from China," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, vol. 6(4), pages 568-591, December.
    6. Kind, Michael, 2015. "Start me up: How fathers' unemployment affects their sons' school-to-work transitions," Ruhr Economic Papers 583, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.

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