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Start me up: How fathers' unemployment affects their sons' school-to-work transitions

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  • Kind, Michael

Abstract

Using data from the German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP), continuous-time duration models are applied to examine whether paternal unemployment delays sons' school-to-work transitions and thus leads to a spell of early career non-employment. The results show that substantial delaying effects of fathers' unemployment exist and that they are heterogeneous among educational groups. Therefore, paternal unemployment implies long-run intergenerational costs by hindering sons' smooth school-to-work transitions which can be expected to have long-lasting negative labor market consequences.

Suggested Citation

  • Kind, Michael, 2015. "Start me up: How fathers' unemployment affects their sons' school-to-work transitions," Ruhr Economic Papers 583, RWI - Leibniz-Institut für Wirtschaftsforschung, Ruhr-University Bochum, TU Dortmund University, University of Duisburg-Essen.
  • Handle: RePEc:zbw:rwirep:583
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Mäder Miriam & Schwientek Caroline & Riphahn Regina T. & Müller Steffen, 2015. "Intergenerational Transmission of Unemployment – Evidence for German Sons," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 235(4-5), pages 355-375, August.
    2. Burgess, Simon & Propper, Carol & Rees, Hedley & Shearer, Arran, 2003. "The class of 1981: the effects of early career unemployment on subsequent unemployment experiences," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 10(3), pages 291-309, June.
    3. Sveinn Agnarsson & Paul S. Carlin, 2002. "SFamily Background and the Estimated Return to Schooling: Swedish Evidenc," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 37(3), pages 680-692.
    4. Gregg, Paul & Tominey, Emma, 2005. "The wage scar from male youth unemployment," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 12(4), pages 487-509, August.
    5. John P. Haisken-DeNew & Markus H. Hahn, 2010. "PanelWhiz: Efficient Data Extraction of Complex Panel Data Sets - An Example Using the German SOEP," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 130(4), pages 643-654.
    6. Michael Kind & John P. Haisken-DeNew, 2012. "Sons' Unexpected Long Term Scarring Due to Fathers' Unemployment," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n21, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    7. Michael Kind & John P. Haisken-DeNew, 2012. "Unexpected Victims: How Parents' Unemployment Affects Their Children's Life Satisfaction," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2012n02, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    8. Yuanyuan Chen & Shuaizhang Feng, 2011. "Parental education and wages: Evidence from China," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, vol. 6(4), pages 568-591, December.
    9. Michele Pellizzari, 2010. "Do Friends and Relatives Really Help in Getting a Good Job?," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 63(3), pages 494-510, April.
    10. Paul Ryan, 2001. "The School-to-Work Transition: A Cross-National Perspective: Corrigendum," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(3), pages 767-767, September.
    11. repec:bav:wpaper:155_maeder_mueller_riphahn_schwientek is not listed on IDEAS
    12. Paul Ryan, 2001. "The School-to-Work Transition: A Cross-National Perspective," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 39(1), pages 34-92, March.
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    1. repec:sgh:gosnar:y:2017:i:6:p:31-56 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    school-to-work transition; parental unemployment; youth unemployment;

    JEL classification:

    • J64 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Unemployment: Models, Duration, Incidence, and Job Search

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