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The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, Disruptions to Education, and the Returns to Schooling in Urban China

Author

Listed:
  • Albert Park

    () (Department of Economics, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology
    Institute for Emerging Market Studies, Hong Kong University of Science and Technology)

  • John Giles

    () (The World Bank)

  • Meiyan Wang

    (Institute for Population and Labor Economics, Chinese Academy of Social Sciences)

Abstract

This paper provides new evidence on educational disruptions caused by the Cultural Revolution and identifies the returns to schooling in urban China by exploiting individual-level variation in the effects of city-wide disruptions to education. The return to college is estimated at 49.8% using a conventional Mincer-type specification and averages 37.1% using supply shocks as instruments and controlling for ability and school quality, suggesting that high-ability students select into higher education. Additional tests show that the results are unlikely to be driven by sample selection bias associated with migration or alternative pathways through which the Cultural Revolution influenced adult productivity.

Suggested Citation

  • Albert Park & John Giles & Meiyan Wang, 2015. "The Great Proletarian Cultural Revolution, Disruptions to Education, and the Returns to Schooling in Urban China," HKUST IEMS Working Paper Series 2015-21, HKUST Institute for Emerging Market Studies, revised Mar 2015.
  • Handle: RePEc:hku:wpaper:201521
    as

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    References listed on IDEAS

    as
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    returns to schooling; wages; education; China;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • I20 - Health, Education, and Welfare - - Education - - - General
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • O15 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Economic Development: Human Resources; Human Development; Income Distribution; Migration
    • O53 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economywide Country Studies - - - Asia including Middle East

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