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Parental Education and Investment in Children's Human Capital in Rural China

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  • Brown, Philip H

Abstract

Numerous empirical studies from developing countries have noted that parental education has a robust and positive effect on child learning, a result that is often attributed to more educated parents making greater investments in their children's human capital. However, the nature of any such investment has not been well understood. This study examines how parental education affects various parental investments in goods and time used in children's human capital production via an unusually detailed survey from rural China. It is found that more educated parents make greater educational investments in both goods and time and that these relationships are generally robust to a rich set of controls. Evidence suggests that making greater investments in both goods and time stems both from higher expected returns to education for children and from different preferences for education among more educated parents. A second key finding is that the marginal effect of mother's education on educational investments is generally larger than that of father's education.

Suggested Citation

  • Brown, Philip H, 2006. "Parental Education and Investment in Children's Human Capital in Rural China," Economic Development and Cultural Change, University of Chicago Press, vol. 54(4), pages 759-789, July.
  • Handle: RePEc:ucp:ecdecc:y:2006:v:54:i:4:p:759-89
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    File URL: http://dx.doi.org/10.1086/503582
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Cited by:

    1. L. Guarcello & I. Kovrova & F. C. Rosati, 2008. "Child labour as a response to shocks: evidence from Cambodian villages," UCW Working Paper 37, Understanding Children's Work (UCW Programme).
    2. repec:bla:asiaps:v:4:y:2017:i:3:p:586-601 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Feng Hu, 2013. "Does migration benefit the schooling of children left behind?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 29(2), pages 33-70, July.
    4. Debasis Bandyopadhyay & Xueli Tang, 2011. "Parental nurturing and adverse effects of redistribution," Journal of Economic Growth, Springer, vol. 16(1), pages 71-98, March.
    5. Anuneeta Mitra, 2016. "Education and earning linkages of regular and casual workers in India: a quantile regression approach," Journal of Social and Economic Development, Springer;Institute for Social and Economic Change, vol. 18(1), pages 147-174, October.
    6. Tharmmapornphilas, Rubkwan, 2013. "Impact of household factors on youth's school decisions in Thailand," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 37(C), pages 258-272.
    7. Cristian Pop-Eleches & Miguel Urquiola, 2013. "Going to a Better School: Effects and Behavioral Responses," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 103(4), pages 1289-1324, June.
    8. Majlesi, Kaveh, 2014. "Demand for Low-Skilled Labor and Parental Investment in Children's Education: Evidence from Mexico," Working Papers 2014:5, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    9. Zhang, Huafeng, 2014. "The poverty trap of education: Education–poverty connections in Western China," International Journal of Educational Development, Elsevier, vol. 38(C), pages 47-58.
    10. repec:pal:eurjdr:v:29:y:2017:i:2:d:10.1057_s41287-016-0012-0 is not listed on IDEAS
    11. Ding, Weili & Zhang, Yuan, 2014. "When a son is born: The impact of fertility patterns on family finance in rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 30(C), pages 192-208.
    12. repec:eee:injoed:v:54:y:2017:i:c:p:39-50 is not listed on IDEAS
    13. Chad Meyerhoefer & C. Chen, 2011. "The effect of parental labor migration on children’s educational progress in rural china," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 9(3), pages 379-396, September.
    14. Han, Li, 2013. "Is centralized teacher deployment more equitable? Evidence from rural China," China Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 24(C), pages 65-76.
    15. Paul Frijters & Luo Chuliang & Xin Meng, 2012. "Child Education and the Family Income Gradient in China," Discussion Papers Series 470, School of Economics, University of Queensland, Australia.
    16. Yuanyuan Chen & Shuaizhang Feng, 2011. "Parental education and wages: Evidence from China," Frontiers of Economics in China, Springer;Higher Education Press, vol. 6(4), pages 568-591, December.
    17. Sun, Ang & Yao, Yang, 2010. "Health shocks and children's school attainments in rural China," Economics of Education Review, Elsevier, vol. 29(3), pages 375-382, June.
    18. Basant, Rakesh & Sen, Gitanjali, 2014. "Parental Education as a Criterion for Affirmative Action in Higher Education," World Development, Elsevier, vol. 64(C), pages 803-814.
    19. Mohammad Reza Farzanegan & Sherif Maher Hassan & Ribal Abi Raad, 2017. "Causes and Impacts of Remittances: Household Survey Evidence from Egypt," MAGKS Papers on Economics 201737, Philipps-Universität Marburg, Faculty of Business Administration and Economics, Department of Economics (Volkswirtschaftliche Abteilung).

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