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The Impact of September 11th, 2001 on the Employment Prospects of Arabs and Muslims in the German Labor Market

Listed author(s):
  • Braakmann Nils

    ()

    (Empirical Economics, Institute of Economics, Leuphana University Lueneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1, 21335 Lüneburg, Germany)

This paper examines whether the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11th, 2001 have influenced the job prospects of persons from predominantly Muslim countries in the German labor market. The paper uses a large, representative database of the German working population drawn from administrative sources and forms treatment and control groups based on current nationality. Evidence from regression-adjusted difference-in-differences estimates, estimated by piecewise constant exponential duration models, indicates that 9/11 did not cause a severe decline in job prospects for individuals with a nationality from a predominantly Muslim country. This result is robust when looking at Turks, individuals with a nationality from an Arab country and individuals from Non-Arab, but predominantly Muslim countries relative to a number of control groups. It is also in line with prior evidence from Sweden and England.

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File URL: https://www.degruyter.com/view/j/jbnst.2009.229.issue-1/jbnst-2009-0102/jbnst-2009-0102.xml?format=INT
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Article provided by De Gruyter in its journal Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik).

Volume (Year): 229 (2009)
Issue (Month): 1 (February)
Pages: 2-21

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Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:229:y:2009:i:1:p:2-21
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  1. Carlsson, Magnus & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2007. "Evidence of ethnic discrimination in the Swedish labor market using experimental data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 716-729, August.
  2. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2007. "Viewpoint: Replication in economics," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 40(3), pages 715-733, August.
  3. Peter Jacobebbinghaus & Stefan Seth, 2007. "European Data Watch: The German Integrated Employment Biographies Sample IEBS," Schmollers Jahrbuch : Journal of Applied Social Science Studies / Zeitschrift für Wirtschafts- und Sozialwissenschaften, Duncker & Humblot, Berlin, vol. 127(2), pages 335-342.
  4. Juhn, Chinhui & Murphy, Kevin M & Pierce, Brooks, 1993. "Wage Inequality and the Rise in Returns to Skill," Journal of Political Economy, University of Chicago Press, vol. 101(3), pages 410-442, June.
  5. Olof Åslund & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2005. "Shifts in attitudes and labor market discrimination: Swedish experiences after 9-11," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 603-629, November.
  6. Phelps, Edmund S, 1972. "The Statistical Theory of Racism and Sexism," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 62(4), pages 659-661, September.
  7. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2000. "The Craft of Labormetrics," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 53(3), pages 363-380, April.
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