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The Impact of September 11th, 2001 on the Employment Prospects of Arabs and Muslims in the German Labor Market

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  • Braakmann Nils

    () (Empirical Economics, Institute of Economics, Leuphana University Lueneburg, Scharnhorststraße 1, 21335 Lüneburg, Germany)

Abstract

This paper examines whether the attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon on September 11th, 2001 have influenced the job prospects of persons from predominantly Muslim countries in the German labor market. The paper uses a large, representative database of the German working population drawn from administrative sources and forms treatment and control groups based on current nationality. Evidence from regression-adjusted difference-in-differences estimates, estimated by piecewise constant exponential duration models, indicates that 9/11 did not cause a severe decline in job prospects for individuals with a nationality from a predominantly Muslim country. This result is robust when looking at Turks, individuals with a nationality from an Arab country and individuals from Non-Arab, but predominantly Muslim countries relative to a number of control groups. It is also in line with prior evidence from Sweden and England.

Suggested Citation

  • Braakmann Nils, 2009. "The Impact of September 11th, 2001 on the Employment Prospects of Arabs and Muslims in the German Labor Market," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 229(1), pages 2-21, February.
  • Handle: RePEc:jns:jbstat:v:229:y:2009:i:1:p:2-21
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Carlsson, Magnus & Rooth, Dan-Olof, 2007. "Evidence of ethnic discrimination in the Swedish labor market using experimental data," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 14(4), pages 716-729, August.
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    5. Olof Åslund & Dan-Olof Rooth, 2005. "Shifts in attitudes and labor market discrimination: Swedish experiences after 9-11," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 603-629, November.
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    Cited by:

    1. Simone Schüller, 2016. "The Effects of 9/11 on Attitudes toward Immigration and the Moderating Role of Education," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(4), pages 604-632, November.
    2. Johnston, David W. & Lordan, Grace, 2012. "Discrimination makes me sick! An examination of the discrimination–health relationship," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 31(1), pages 99-111.
    3. Sami Miaari & Asaf Zussman & Noam Zussman, 2012. "Ethnic conflict and job separations," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(2), pages 419-437, January.
    4. Cornelissen, Thomas & Jirjahn, Uwe, 2012. "September 11th and the earnings of Muslims in Germany—The moderating role of education and firm size," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 81(2), pages 490-504.
    5. Faisal Rabby & William Rodgers, 2011. "Post 9-11 U.S. Muslim Labor Market Outcomes," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 39(3), pages 273-289, September.
    6. Anita Ratcliffe & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2013. "The London Bombings and Racial Prejudice: Evidence from Housing and Labour Markets," Working Papers 2013013, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
    7. Arne Risa Hole & Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "The impact of the London bombings on the wellbeing of young Muslims," Working Papers 2015002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

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