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Post 9-11 U.S. Muslim Labor Market Outcomes

Author

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  • Faisal Rabby

    ()

  • William Rodgers

    ()

Abstract

Using a difference-in-differences framework and micro data from the Current Population Survey-Merged Outgoing Rotation Group Files (1999 to 2004), this paper estimates the impact that the 9-11 terrorists attacks had on the U.S. labor market outcomes of individuals with nativity profiles similar to the terrorists. We find that shortly after the attacks, the employment-population ratios and hours worked of very young (ages 16 to 25) Muslim men fell. By 2004, most losses had begun to dissipate. The employment-population ratios and hours worked of older Muslim men experienced little deterioration. We find no effect of the U.K.’s July 2005 London bombings on the labor market outcomes of U.S. Muslims. Copyright International Atlantic Economic Society 2011

Suggested Citation

  • Faisal Rabby & William Rodgers, 2011. "Post 9-11 U.S. Muslim Labor Market Outcomes," Atlantic Economic Journal, Springer;International Atlantic Economic Society, vol. 39(3), pages 273-289, September.
  • Handle: RePEc:kap:atlecj:v:39:y:2011:i:3:p:273-289
    DOI: 10.1007/s11293-011-9281-3
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    File URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10.1007/s11293-011-9281-3
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Nils Braakmann, 2007. "Islamistic Terror, the War on Iraq and the Job Prospects of Arab Men in Britain: Does a Country’s Direct Involvement Matter? This paper examines whether the labor market prospects of Arab men in Engla," Working Paper Series in Economics 70, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    2. Neeraj Kaushal & Robert Kaestner & Cordelia Reimers, 2007. "Labor Market Effects of September 11th on Arab and Muslim Residents of the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(2).
    3. Braakmann Nils, 2009. "The Impact of September 11th, 2001 on the Employment Prospects of Arabs and Muslims in the German Labor Market," Journal of Economics and Statistics (Jahrbuecher fuer Nationaloekonomie und Statistik), De Gruyter, vol. 229(1), pages 2-21, February.
    4. Alberto Dávila & Marie Mora, 2005. "Changes in the earnings of Arab men in the US between 2000 and 2002," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 587-601, November.
    5. Pia M. Orrenius & Madeline Zavodny, 2009. "The effects of tougher enforcement on the job prospects of recent Latin American immigrants," Journal of Policy Analysis and Management, John Wiley & Sons, Ltd., vol. 28(2), pages 239-257.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Muslim; Arab; Discrimination; Islamic terror; Employment; 9-11; September 11; J15; J61; J71;

    JEL classification:

    • J15 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demographic Economics - - - Economics of Minorities, Races, Indigenous Peoples, and Immigrants; Non-labor Discrimination
    • J61 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Mobility, Unemployment, Vacancies, and Immigrant Workers - - - Geographic Labor Mobility; Immigrant Workers
    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing

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