IDEAS home Printed from https://ideas.repec.org/a/eee/ecolet/v115y2012i1p91-93.html
   My bibliography  Save this article

Did the September 11th attacks affect the Canadian labour market?

Author

Listed:
  • Shannon, Michael

Abstract

Difference-in-differences estimates of the effects of the September 11th attacks on labour market outcomes of Muslims are generated using 2001 and 2006 Canadian Census data. Little evidence of negative, significant impacts on employment, hours, weeks-worked or wages is found.

Suggested Citation

  • Shannon, Michael, 2012. "Did the September 11th attacks affect the Canadian labour market?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 115(1), pages 91-93.
  • Handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:115:y:2012:i:1:p:91-93
    DOI: 10.1016/j.econlet.2011.12.003
    as

    Download full text from publisher

    File URL: http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S016517651100512X
    Download Restriction: Full text for ScienceDirect subscribers only

    As the access to this document is restricted, you may want to search for a different version of it.

    References listed on IDEAS

    as
    1. A. Smith, Jeffrey & E. Todd, Petra, 2005. "Does matching overcome LaLonde's critique of nonexperimental estimators?," Journal of Econometrics, Elsevier, vol. 125(1-2), pages 305-353.
    2. Neeraj Kaushal & Robert Kaestner & Cordelia Reimers, 2007. "Labor Market Effects of September 11th on Arab and Muslim Residents of the United States," Journal of Human Resources, University of Wisconsin Press, vol. 42(2).
    3. Nils Braakmann, 2007. "Islamistic Terror, the War on Iraq and the Job Prospects of Arab Men in Britain: Does a Country’s Direct Involvement Matter? This paper examines whether the labor market prospects of Arab men in Engla," Working Paper Series in Economics 70, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
    4. Faisal Rabby & William M. Rodgers, 2009. "Post 9-11 U.S. Muslim Labor Market Outcomes," Economics of Security Working Paper Series 19, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    5. Alberto Dávila & Marie Mora, 2005. "Changes in the earnings of Arab men in the US between 2000 and 2002," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 18(4), pages 587-601, November.
    6. Goel, Deepti, 2009. "Perceptions and Labor Market Outcomes of Immigrants in Australia after 9/11," IZA Discussion Papers 4356, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    7. Rabby, Faisal & Rodgers III, William M., 2009. "Post 9-11 U.S. Muslim Labor Market Outcomes," IZA Discussion Papers 4411, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    Full references (including those not matched with items on IDEAS)

    Citations

    Citations are extracted by the CitEc Project, subscribe to its RSS feed for this item.
    as


    Cited by:

    1. Simone Schüller, 2016. "The Effects of 9/11 on Attitudes toward Immigration and the Moderating Role of Education," Kyklos, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 69(4), pages 604-632, November.
    2. repec:spr:jopoec:v:31:y:2018:i:1:d:10.1007_s00148-017-0646-z is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Anita Ratcliffe & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2013. "The London Bombings and Racial Prejudice: Evidence from Housing and Labour Markets," Working Papers 2013013, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

    More about this item

    Keywords

    Discrimination; Wages; Employment;

    JEL classification:

    • J71 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Labor Discrimination - - - Hiring and Firing
    • J30 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - General
    • J21 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Labor Force and Employment, Size, and Structure

    Statistics

    Access and download statistics

    Corrections

    All material on this site has been provided by the respective publishers and authors. You can help correct errors and omissions. When requesting a correction, please mention this item's handle: RePEc:eee:ecolet:v:115:y:2012:i:1:p:91-93. See general information about how to correct material in RePEc.

    For technical questions regarding this item, or to correct its authors, title, abstract, bibliographic or download information, contact: (Dana Niculescu). General contact details of provider: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/ecolet .

    If you have authored this item and are not yet registered with RePEc, we encourage you to do it here. This allows to link your profile to this item. It also allows you to accept potential citations to this item that we are uncertain about.

    If CitEc recognized a reference but did not link an item in RePEc to it, you can help with this form .

    If you know of missing items citing this one, you can help us creating those links by adding the relevant references in the same way as above, for each refering item. If you are a registered author of this item, you may also want to check the "citations" tab in your RePEc Author Service profile, as there may be some citations waiting for confirmation.

    Please note that corrections may take a couple of weeks to filter through the various RePEc services.

    IDEAS is a RePEc service hosted by the Research Division of the Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis . RePEc uses bibliographic data supplied by the respective publishers.