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Cultural Leaders and the Clash of Civilizations

Author

Listed:
  • Esther Hauk

    (Institute of Economic Analysis (IAE-CSIC) and Barcelona Graduate School, Barcelona, Spain)

  • Hannes Mueller

    () (Institute of Economic Analysis (IAE-CSIC) and Barcelona Graduate School, Barcelona, Spain)

Abstract

This article builds a microfounded model of cultural conflict. In this model, intrinsically motivated cultural leaders supply and interpret culture. Leaders have an incentive to amplify disagreement about cultural values. This leads to a clash of perspectives between cultures. The population benefits from the supply of culture but suffers if leaders amplify the clash of perspectives. The article discusses constraints to leader behavior and analyzes how economic factors affect the incentives of cultural leaders. Economic strength can lead to displays of cultural arrogance while economic integration between groups can hinder cultural alienation.

Suggested Citation

  • Esther Hauk & Hannes Mueller, 2015. "Cultural Leaders and the Clash of Civilizations," Journal of Conflict Resolution, Peace Science Society (International), vol. 59(3), pages 367-400, April.
  • Handle: RePEc:sae:jocore:v:59:y:2015:i:3:p:367-400
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Kazutoshi Miyazawa & Hikaru Ogawa & Toshiki Tamai, 2018. "Tax Competition and Fiscal Sustainability," CIRJE F-Series CIRJE-F-1104, CIRJE, Faculty of Economics, University of Tokyo.
    2. repec:eee:jetheo:v:175:y:2018:i:c:p:374-414 is not listed on IDEAS
    3. Verdier, Thierry & Zenou, Yves, 2018. "Cultural leader and the dynamics of assimilation," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 175(C), pages 374-414.
    4. Jennings, Colin & Sanchez-Pages, Santiago, 2017. "Social capital, conflict and welfare," Journal of Development Economics, Elsevier, vol. 124(C), pages 157-167.
    5. Prummer, Anja & Siedlarek, Jan-Peter, 2017. "Community leaders and the preservation of cultural traits," Journal of Economic Theory, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 143-176.
    6. Sato, Yasuhiro & Zenou, Yves, 2018. "Assimilation Patterns in Cities," CEPR Discussion Papers 13364, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    7. Verdier, Thierry & Zenou, Yves, 2015. "The role of cultural leaders in the transmission of preferences," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 136(C), pages 158-161.
    8. repec:eee:deveco:v:134:y:2018:i:c:p:416-427 is not listed on IDEAS

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