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Replication in Economics

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  • Daniel S. Hamermesh

Abstract

This examination of the role and potential for replication in economics points out the paucity of both pure replication -- checking on others' published papers using their data -- and scientific replication -- using data representing different populations in one's own work or in a Comment. Several controversies in empirical economics illustrate how and how not to behave when replicating others' work. The incentives for replication facing editors, authors and potential replicators are examined. Recognising these incentives, I advance proposals aimed at journal editors that will increase the supply of replication studies, and I propose a way of generating more scientific replication that will make empirical economic research more credible.

Suggested Citation

  • Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2007. "Replication in Economics," NBER Working Papers 13026, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:13026
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Card, David & Krueger, Alan B, 1994. "Minimum Wages and Employment: A Case Study of the Fast-Food Industry in New Jersey and Pennsylvania," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 84(4), pages 772-793, September.
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    9. Daniel S. Hamermesh, 2002. "International Labor Economics," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 20(4), pages 709-732, October.
    10. Kate L. Antonovics & Arthur S. Goldberger, 2005. "Does Increasing Women's Schooling Raise the Schooling of the Next Generation? Comment," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 95(5), pages 1738-1744, December.
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    14. Hunter, John E, 2001. " The Desperate Need for Replications," Journal of Consumer Research, Oxford University Press, vol. 28(1), pages 149-158, June.
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    Cited by:

    1. Maren Duvendack & Richard Palmer-Jones & W. Robert Reed, 2017. "What Is Meant by "Replication" and Why Does It Encounter Resistance in Economics?," American Economic Review, American Economic Association, vol. 107(5), pages 46-51, May.
    2. Hussinger, Katrin & Pellens, Maikel, 2017. "Guilt by association: How scientific misconduct harms prior collaborators," ZEW Discussion Papers 17-051, ZEW - Zentrum für Europäische Wirtschaftsforschung / Center for European Economic Research.
    3. Bruno S. Frey, 2010. "Withering Academia," CREMA Working Paper Series 2010-19, Center for Research in Economics, Management and the Arts (CREMA).
    4. repec:eee:respol:v:47:y:2018:i:5:p:827-839 is not listed on IDEAS
    5. repec:zbw:ifweej:201819 is not listed on IDEAS
    6. Simonetta LONGHI & Peter NIJKAMP & Jacques POOT, 2008. "Meta-Analysis Of Empirical Evidence On The Labour Market Impacts Of Immigration," Region et Developpement, Region et Developpement, LEAD, Universite du Sud - Toulon Var, vol. 27, pages 161-191.
    7. Kiri, Bralind & Lacetera, Nicola & Zirulia, Lorenzo, 2018. "Above a swamp: A theory of high-quality scientific production," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 47(5), pages 827-839.
    8. Furman, Jeffrey L. & Jensen, Kyle & Murray, Fiona, 2012. "Governing knowledge in the scientific community: Exploring the role of retractions in biomedicine," Research Policy, Elsevier, vol. 41(2), pages 276-290.
    9. Nicola Lacetera & Lorenzo Zirulia, 2011. "The Economics of Scientific Misconduct," Journal of Law, Economics, and Organization, Oxford University Press, vol. 27(3), pages 568-603.
    10. Daniels, Gerald Eric & Kakar, Venoo, 2017. "Normalized CES supply-side system approach: How to replicate Klump, McAdam, and Willman (Review of Economics and Statistics, 2007)," Economics Discussion Papers 2017-70, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).
    11. Santi Budria & Luis Diaz-Serrano & Ada Ferrer-i-Carbonell & Joop Hartog, 2013. "Risk attitude and wage growth: replicating Shaw (1996)," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 44(2), pages 981-1004, April.
    12. Karl-Heinz Tödter, 2009. "Benford's Law as an Indicator of Fraud in Economics," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 10, pages 339-351, August.
    13. Brian Goesling, 2015. "Making Sense of Replication Studies: Guidance for Teen Pregnancy Prevention Researchers," Mathematica Policy Research Reports 02bb275446464c37a4fddbcdf, Mathematica Policy Research.
    14. Owen, Dorian, 2017. "Replication to assess statistical adequacy," Economics Discussion Papers 2017-73, Kiel Institute for the World Economy (IfW).

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • A14 - General Economics and Teaching - - General Economics - - - Sociology of Economics
    • B41 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - Economic Methodology
    • C59 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling - - - Other

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