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Do economics journal archives promote replicable research?

Author

Listed:
  • B.D. McCullough
  • Kerry Anne McGeary
  • Teresa D. Harrison

Abstract

can rarely be reproduced using the data+code in the journal archive. Recently created archives at top journals should avoid the mistakes of their predecessors. We categorize reasons for archives' failures and identify successful policies.

Suggested Citation

  • B.D. McCullough & Kerry Anne McGeary & Teresa D. Harrison, 2008. "Do economics journal archives promote replicable research?," Canadian Journal of Economics, Canadian Economics Association, vol. 41(4), pages 1406-1420, November.
  • Handle: RePEc:cje:issued:v:41:y:2008:i:4:p:1406-1420
    DOI: 10.1111/j.1540-5982.2008.00509.x
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • B40 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology - - - General
    • C80 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Data Collection and Data Estimation Methodology; Computer Programs - - - General

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