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La Réplica en el Análisis Económico Aplicado/Replication in Applied Economic Analysis

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  • HERNÁNDEZ ALEMÁN, ANASTASIA

    (University Institute of Tourism and Sustainable Economic Development, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria University, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Calle Saulo Torón , 4, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.)

  • LEÓN, CARMELO J.

    (University Institute of Tourism and Sustainable Economic Development, Las Palmas de Gran Canaria University, Campus Universitario de Tafira, Calle Saulo Torón , 4, 35017 Las Palmas de Gran Canaria, Spain.)

Abstract

Este artículo induce a la reflexión acerca de la economía como ciencia. Uno de los principios básicos del método científico es la ?reproductibilidad?, esto es, la capacidad para repetir un experimento. En ello se fundamenta la publicidad de sus resultados y su potencial verificación por la comunidad científica. Este pilar básico del método científico parece estar en cuestión en el análisis económico. Así surgen en la literatura, más recientemente, numerosos artículos que discuten la necesidad de impulsar y promover la réplica de los estudios empíricos aportando lo datos y los códigos que faciliten esta tarea a los investigadores. Ello como parte esencial del progreso científico, aportanto robustez y transparencia a los resultados ya obtenidos y publicados. This paper leads to deliberate on economics as a science. One of the basic principles of the scientific method is the "reproducibility", so an experiment can be tested o repeat it. This is based on the publicity of its results and its potential verification by the scientific community. Nowadays, this basic rule of the scientific method seems to be in question in the economic analysis. Then, we find in the literature, more recently, numerous articles that discuss the need to impulse and promote the replication of empirical studies. Researchers should obtain the author?s dataset and codes that facilitate the replication or verification or reproducibility. This is an essential part of scientific progress, providing robustness and transparency to the results already obtained and published.

Suggested Citation

  • Hernández Alemán, Anastasia & León, Carmelo J., 2018. "La Réplica en el Análisis Económico Aplicado/Replication in Applied Economic Analysis," Estudios de Economia Aplicada, Estudios de Economia Aplicada, vol. 36, pages 317-332, Enero.
  • Handle: RePEc:lrk:eeaart:36_1_22
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Método científico; economía y réplica ; Scientific Method; Economy and Replication.;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • B4 - Schools of Economic Thought and Methodology - - Economic Methodology
    • C5 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Econometric Modeling

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