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Anita Ratcliffe

Personal Details

First Name:Anita
Middle Name:
Last Name:Ratcliffe
Suffix:
RePEc Short-ID:pra449
http://www.sheffield.ac.uk/economics/people/ratcliffe/index.html
Terminal Degree:2011 School of Economics; University of Bristol (from RePEc Genealogy)

Affiliation

Department of Economics
University of Sheffield

Sheffield, United Kingdom
http://www.shef.ac.uk/economics/

+44 114 222 3399
+ 44 (0)114 222 3458
9 Mappin Street, SHEFFIELD, S1 4DT
RePEc:edi:desheuk (more details at EDIRC)

Research output

as
Jump to: Working papers Articles

Working papers

  1. Arne Risa Hole & Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "The impact of the London bombings on the wellbeing of young Muslims," Working Papers 2015002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  2. Anita Ratcliffe & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2013. "The London Bombings and Racial Prejudice: Evidence from Housing and Labour Markets," Working Papers 2013013, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  3. Anita Ratcliffe & Karl Taylor, 2013. "Who Cares about Stock Market Booms and Busts? Evidence from Data on Mental Wellbeing," Working Papers 2012021, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  4. Anita Ratcliffe, 2012. "Wealth Effects or Economic Barometer: Why Do House Prices Matter for Psychological Health?," Working Papers 2012014, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.
  5. Ratcliffe, Anita & Taylor, Karl, 2012. "Who Cares about Stock Market Booms and Busts? Evidence from Data on Mental Health," IZA Discussion Papers 6956, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
  6. Anita Ratcliffe, 2010. "Housing wealth or economic climate: Why do house prices matter for well-being?," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/234, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
  7. Mike Brewer & Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah Smith, 2008. "Does welfare reform affect fertility? Evidence from the UK," IFS Working Papers W08/09, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
  8. Paul Gregg & Paul A. Grout & Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah Smith & Frank Windmeijer, 2008. "How important is pro-social behaviour in the delivery of public services?," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/197, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
  9. Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah Smith, 2006. "Fertility and Women’s Education in the UK: A Cohort Analysis," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 07/165, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.

Articles

  1. Anita Ratcliffe & Karl Taylor, 2015. "Who cares about stock market booms and busts? Evidence from data on mental health," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 826-845.
  2. Anita Ratcliffe & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2015. "The London Bombings And Racial Prejudice: Evidence From The Housing And Labor Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(1), pages 276-293, January.
  3. Richard Disney & Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah Smith, 2015. "Booms, Busts and Retirement Timing," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 82(327), pages 399-419, July.
  4. Mike Brewer & Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah dSmith, 2012. "Does welfare reform affect fertility? Evidence from the UK," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 245-266, January.
  5. Gregg, Paul & Grout, Paul A. & Ratcliffe, Anita & Smith, Sarah & Windmeijer, Frank, 2011. "How important is pro-social behaviour in the delivery of public services?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 758-766, August.

Citations

Many of the citations below have been collected in an experimental project, CitEc, where a more detailed citation analysis can be found. These are citations from works listed in RePEc that could be analyzed mechanically. So far, only a minority of all works could be analyzed. See under "Corrections" how you can help improve the citation analysis.

Working papers

  1. Anita Ratcliffe & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2013. "The London Bombings and Racial Prejudice: Evidence from Housing and Labour Markets," Working Papers 2013013, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Sander WAGNER & Ivaylo D. PETEV, 2019. "The Economic Penalty of Terrorism: Increase in Discrimination Against Arabs and Muslims after Paris Attacks," Working Papers 2019-22, Center for Research in Economics and Statistics.
    2. Paresh Kumar Narayan & Seema Narayan & Siroos Khademalomoom & Dinh Hoang Bach Phan, 2018. "Do Terrorist Attacks Impact Exchange Rate Behavior? New International Evidence," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 56(1), pages 547-561, January.
    3. Nowak, Adam & Sayago-Gomez, Juan, 2018. "Homeowner preferences after September 11th, a microdata approach," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 70(C), pages 330-351.
    4. van Duijn, Mark & Rouwendal, Jan & Boersema, Richard, 2016. "Redevelopment of industrial heritage: Insights into external effects on house prices," Regional Science and Urban Economics, Elsevier, vol. 57(C), pages 91-107.
    5. Brodeur, Abel & Wright, Taylor, 2019. "Terrorism, immigration and asylum approval," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 119-131.
    6. Arne Risa Hole & Anita Ratcliffe, 2015. "The impact of the London bombings on the wellbeing of young Muslims," Working Papers 2015002, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

  2. Anita Ratcliffe, 2012. "Wealth Effects or Economic Barometer: Why Do House Prices Matter for Psychological Health?," Working Papers 2012014, The University of Sheffield, Department of Economics.

    Cited by:

    1. Hans van Kippersluis & Titus J. Galama, 2013. "Why the Rich drink more but smoke less: The Impact of Wealth on Health Behaviors," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 13-035/V, Tinbergen Institute.

  3. Ratcliffe, Anita & Taylor, Karl, 2012. "Who Cares about Stock Market Booms and Busts? Evidence from Data on Mental Health," IZA Discussion Papers 6956, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).

    Cited by:

    1. Ningyu Tang & Jingqiu Chen & Kaili Zhang & Thomas Li-Ping Tang, 2018. "Monetary Wisdom: How Do Investors Use Love of Money to Frame Stock Volatility and Enhance Stock Happiness?," Journal of Happiness Studies, Springer, vol. 19(6), pages 1831-1862, August.
    2. Corrado Giulietti & Mirco Tonin & Michael Vlassopoulos, 2018. "When the Market Drives you Crazy: Stock Market Returns and Fatal Car Accidents," CESifo Working Paper Series 7182, CESifo.
    3. Tonzer, Lena, 2017. "Uncertainty, financial crises, and subjective well-being," IWH Discussion Papers 2/2017, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    4. Brown, Sarah & Harris, Mark N. & Srivastava, Preety & Taylor, Karl, 2018. "Mental Health and Reporting Bias: Analysis of the GHQ-12," IZA Discussion Papers 11771, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    5. Frijters, Paul & Johnston, David W. & Shields, Michael A. & Sinha, Kompal, 2015. "A lifecycle perspective of stock market performance and wellbeing," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 112(C), pages 237-250.
    6. Emilio Colombo & Valentina Rotondi & Luca Stanca, 2018. "Macroeconomic conditions and well-being: do social interactions matter?," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 50(28), pages 3029-3038, June.

  4. Anita Ratcliffe, 2010. "Housing wealth or economic climate: Why do house prices matter for well-being?," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 10/234, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Clément Bellet, 2017. "Essays on Inequality, Social Preferences and Consumer Behavior," Sciences Po publications info:hdl:2441/vbu6kd1s68o, Sciences Po.
    2. Clement Bellet, 2017. "The Paradox of the Joneses: Superstar Houses and Mortgage Frenzy in Suburban America," CEP Discussion Papers dp1462, Centre for Economic Performance, LSE.
    3. Bellet, Clement, 2017. "The paradox of the Joneses: superstar houses andmortgage frenzy in suburban America," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 69044, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.

  5. Mike Brewer & Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah Smith, 2008. "Does welfare reform affect fertility? Evidence from the UK," IFS Working Papers W08/09, Institute for Fiscal Studies.

    Cited by:

    1. Gordey Yastrebov, 2016. "Intergenerational Social Mobility in Soviet and Post-Soviet Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 69/SOC/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    2. Libertad González Luna & Sofia Trommlerová, 2020. "Cash transfers and fertility: How the introduction and cancellation of a child benefit affected births and abortions," Economics Working Papers 1697, Department of Economics and Business, Universitat Pompeu Fabra.
    3. Anderberg, Dan & Chevalier, Arnaud & Wadsworth, Jonathan, 2011. "Anatomy of a health scare: Education, income and the MMR controversy in the UK," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 30(3), pages 515-530, May.
    4. Stephen M. Miller & Kyriakos Neanidis, 2014. "Demographic Transition and Economic Welfare: The Role of In-Cash and In-Kind Transfers," Working papers 2014-24, University of Connecticut, Department of Economics.
    5. Rossin-Slater, Maya & Wüst, Miriam, 2018. "Parental responses to child support obligations: Evidence from administrative data," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 164(C), pages 183-196.
    6. Azmat, Ghazala & González, Libertad, 2010. "Targeting fertility and female participation through the income tax," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 17(3), pages 487-502, June.
    7. Ann Berrington & Juliet Stone & Eva Beaujouan, 2015. "Educational differences in timing and quantum of childbearing in Britain," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 33(26), pages 733-764.
    8. Tibor Paul Hanappi & Sandra Müllbacher, 2016. "Tax incentives and family labor supply in Austria," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 14(4), pages 961-987, December.
    9. REINSTADLER Anne, 2011. "Luxembourg and France: Comparable Family Benefits, Comparable Fertility Levels?," LISER Working Paper Series 2011-65, LISER.
    10. Regina T. Riphahn & Frederik Wiynck, 2016. "Fertility Effects of Child Benefits," Working Papers 164, Bavarian Graduate Program in Economics (BGPE).
    11. Peter Bönisch & Walter Hyll, 2015. "Television Role Models and Fertility: Evidence from a Natural Experiment," SOEPpapers on Multidisciplinary Panel Data Research 752, DIW Berlin, The German Socio-Economic Panel (SOEP).
    12. Chris Herbst, 2013. "Welfare reform and the subjective well-being of single mothers," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 203-238, January.
    13. Ian Dey & Fran Wasoff, 2010. "Another Child? Fertility Ideals, Resources and Opportunities," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(6), pages 921-940, December.
    14. Stichnoth, Holger, 2014. "Short-run fertility effects of parental leave benefits: Evidence from a structural model," ZEW Discussion Papers 14-069, ZEW - Leibniz Centre for European Economic Research.
    15. Eva Mörk & Anna Sjögren & Helena Svaleryd, 2010. "Childcare Costs and the Demand for Children - Evidence from a Nationwide Reform," CESifo Working Paper Series 3210, CESifo.
    16. Helmut Rainer & Stefan Bauernschuster & Natalia Danzer & Anita Fichtl & Timo Hener & Christian Holzner & Janina Reinkowski, 2013. "Kindergeld und Kinderfreibeträge in Deutschland: Evaluierung der Auswirkungen auf familienpolitische Ziele," ifo Schnelldienst, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich, vol. 66(09), pages 28-36, April.
    17. Svetlana Biryukova & Oxana Sinyavskaya & Irina Nurimanova, 2016. "Estimating effects of 2007 family policy changes on probability of second and subsequent births in Russia," HSE Working papers WP BRP 68/SOC/2016, National Research University Higher School of Economics.
    18. Cygan-Rehm, Kamila, 2013. "Earnings-Dependent Parental Leave Benefit and Fertility: Evidence from Germany," VfS Annual Conference 2013 (Duesseldorf): Competition Policy and Regulation in a Global Economic Order 80021, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    19. Miyazawa, Kazutoshi, 2016. "Grandparental child care, child allowances, and fertility," The Journal of the Economics of Ageing, Elsevier, vol. 7(C), pages 53-60.
    20. Kamila Cygan-Rehm, 2016. "Parental leave benefit and differential fertility responses: evidence from a German reform," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 29(1), pages 73-103, January.
    21. Kabir Dasgupta & Keshar Ghimire & Alexander Plum, 2020. "Impact of State Children’s Health Insurance Program on Fertility of Immigrant Women," Working Papers 2020-09, Auckland University of Technology, Department of Economics.
    22. Ohinata, Asako, 2008. "Fertility Response to Financial Incentives-Evidence from the Working Families Tax Credit in the UK," The Warwick Economics Research Paper Series (TWERPS) 851, University of Warwick, Department of Economics.
    23. Haan, Peter & Wrohlich, Katharina, 2009. "Can Child Care Policy Encourage Employment and Fertility? Evidence from a Structural Model," IZA Discussion Papers 4503, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    24. Jessica Todd & Paul Winters & Guy Stecklov, 2012. "Evaluating the impact of conditional cash transfer programs on fertility: the case of the Red de Protección Social in Nicaragua," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 267-290, January.
    25. Sarolta Laczo & Arpad Abraham, 2015. "Household Behavior and Optimal Property Division upon Divorce," 2015 Meeting Papers 1041, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    26. Kabátek, Jan, 2015. "Essays on public policy and household decision making," Other publications TiSEM 8cdb178e-ad98-42e5-a7e1-b, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    27. John Hoddinott & Tseday J. Mekasha, 2020. "Social Protection, Household Size, and Its Determinants: Evidence from Ethiopia," Journal of Development Studies, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 56(10), pages 1818-1837, October.
    28. Ryo Nakajima & Ryuichi Tanaka, 2012. "Estimating the Effects of Pronatal Policies on Residential Choice and Fertility," GRIPS Discussion Papers 12-06, National Graduate Institute for Policy Studies.
    29. Tudor, Simona, 2020. "Financial incentives, fertility and early life child outcomes," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 64(C).
    30. Eva Mörk & Anna Sjögren & Helena Svaleryd, 2013. "Childcare costs and the demand for children—evidence from a nationwide reform," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 26(1), pages 33-65, January.
    31. Natalie Malak & Md Mahbubur Rahman & Terry A. Yip, 2019. "Baby bonus, anyone? Examining heterogeneous responses to a pro-natalist policy," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 32(4), pages 1205-1246, October.
    32. Raute, Anna, 2019. "Can financial incentives reduce the baby gap? Evidence from a reform in maternity leave benefits," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 203-222.
    33. Kamila Cygan-Rehm, 2015. "Parental Leave Benefit and Differential Fertility Responses: Evidence from a German Reform," CESifo Working Paper Series 5397, CESifo.
    34. Paul Gregg & Lindsey Macmillan, 2009. "Family Income and Education in the Next Generation: Exploring income gradients in education for current cohorts of youth," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 09/223, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
    35. Aksoy, Cevat Giray, 2014. "Are Fertility Responses to Local Unemployment Shocks Homogenous Across Social Strata? Evidence from England, 1994 to 2010," MPRA Paper 58292, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    36. Namkee Ahn & Virginia Sánchez-Marcos, 2020. "Analysis of fertility using cohort-specific socio-economic data," Review of Economics of the Household, Springer, vol. 18(3), pages 711-733, September.

  6. Paul Gregg & Paul A. Grout & Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah Smith & Frank Windmeijer, 2008. "How important is pro-social behaviour in the delivery of public services?," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 08/197, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Fehrler, Sebastian & Kosfeld, Michael, 2012. "Pro-Social Missions and Worker Motivation: An Experimental Study," IZA Discussion Papers 6460, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    2. Lagarde, Mylene & Blaauw, Duane, 2014. "Pro-social preferences and self-selection into jobs: Evidence from South African nurses," Journal of Economic Behavior & Organization, Elsevier, vol. 107(PA), pages 136-152.
    3. Jones, Daniel B. & Propper, Carol & Smith, Sarah, 2017. "Wolves in sheep’s clothing: Is non-profit status used to signal quality?," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 55(C), pages 108-120.
    4. Mirco Tonin & Michael Vlassopoulos, 2015. "Are public sector workers different? Cross-European evidence from elderly workers and retirees," IZA Journal of Labor Economics, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-21, December.
    5. Veliziotis, Michail, 2010. "Trade unions and unpaid overtime in Britain," ISER Working Paper Series 2010-43, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    6. Arjan Non & Ingrid Rohde & Andries de Grip & Thomas Dohmen, 2019. "Mission of the company, prosocial attitudes and job preferences: a discrete choice experiment," CRC TR 224 Discussion Paper Series crctr224_2019_100, University of Bonn and University of Mannheim, Germany.
    7. Cookson, Richard & Laudicella, Mauro & Donni, Paolo Li, 2013. "Does hospital competition harm equity? Evidence from the English National Health Service," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(2), pages 410-422.
    8. Edd Cowley & Sarah Smith, 2013. "Motivation and mission in the public sector: Evidence from the World Values Survey," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 13/299, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.
    9. Robert Dur & Robin Zoutenbier, 2011. "Working for a Good Cause," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 11-168/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 23 Apr 2013.
    10. Christine L. Exley & Stephen J. Terry, 2019. "Wage Elasticities in Working and Volunteering: The Role of Reference Points in a Laboratory Study," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 65(1), pages 413-425, January.
    11. Bart Cockx & Stijn Baert, 2015. "Contracting Out Mandatory Counselling and Training for Long-Term Unemployed. Private For-Profit or Non-Profit, or Keep it Public?," CESifo Working Paper Series 5587, CESifo.
    12. Joseph Lanfranchi & Mathieu Narcy, 2013. "Effort and Monetary Incentives in Nonprofit and For-Profit Organizations," TEPP Working Paper 2013-01, TEPP.
    13. Robert Dur & Max van Lent, 2017. "Serving the Public Interest in Several Ways: Theory and Empirics," CESifo Working Paper Series 6553, CESifo.
    14. Dietrichson, Jens, 2013. "Coordination Incentives, Performance Measurement and Resource Allocation in Public Sector Organizations," Working Papers 2013:26, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    15. Koppel, Hannes & Regner, Tobias, 2019. "What drives motivated agents: The ‘right’ mission or sharing it with the principal?," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 83(C).
    16. Mirco Tonin & Michael Vlassopoulos, 2013. "Social Incentives Matter: Evidence from an Online Real Effort Experiment," Working Papers 2013.05, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
    17. Mark L. Bryan, 2012. "Access to Flexible Working and Informal Care," Scottish Journal of Political Economy, Scottish Economic Society, vol. 59(4), pages 361-389, September.
    18. Danila Serra & Pieter Serneels & Abigail Barr, 2010. "Intrinsic motivations and the non-profit health sector: Evidence from Ethiopia," CSAE Working Paper Series 2010-04, Centre for the Study of African Economies, University of Oxford.
    19. Tobias Regner & Hannes Koppel, 2015. "What drives motivated agents? The 'right' mission or sharing it with the principal," Jena Economic Research Papers 2015-022, Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena.
    20. Margaretha Buurman & Robert Dur, 2008. "Incentives and the Sorting of Altruistic Agents into Street-Level Bureaucracies," Tinbergen Institute Discussion Papers 08-113/1, Tinbergen Institute, revised 14 Oct 2010.
    21. Pérotin, Virginie & Zamora, Bernarda & Reeves, Rachel & Bartlett, Will & Allen, Pauline, 2013. "Does hospital ownership affect patient experience? An investigation into public–private sector differences in England," Journal of Health Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(3), pages 633-646.
    22. Fisher, Paul & Grout, Paul, 2017. "Competition and prudential regulation," Bank of England working papers 675, Bank of England.
    23. Andersson, Fredrik & Jordahl, Henrik, 2011. "Outsourcing Public Services: Ownership, Competition, Quality and Contracting," Working Papers 2011:20, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    24. Anthony Scott & Peter Sivey, 2017. "Motivation and Competition in Health Care," Melbourne Institute Working Paper Series wp2017n05, Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research, The University of Melbourne.
    25. Gani Aldashev & Esteban Jaimovich & Thierry Verdier, 2017. "Small is Beautiful: Motivational Allocation in the Nonprofit Sector," PSE-Ecole d'économie de Paris (Postprint) halshs-01887092, HAL.
    26. Chloé Duvivier & Mathieu Narcy, 2015. "The Motherhood Wage Penalty and Its Determinants: A Public–Private Comparison," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 29(4), pages 415-443, December.
    27. Joseph Lanfranchi & Sanja Pekovic, 2012. "How Green is my Firm? Workers' Attitudes towards Job, Job Involvement and Effort in Environmentally-Related Firms," Working Papers halshs-00744483, HAL.
    28. Heinz, Matthias & Schumacher, Heiner, 2017. "Signaling cooperation," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 98(C), pages 199-216.
    29. Justin Mattias Valasek, 2015. "Reforming an Institutional Culture of Corruption: A Model of Motivated Agents and Collective Reputation," CESifo Working Paper Series 5599, CESifo.
    30. Lagarde, Mylène & Blaauw, Duane, 2014. "Pro-social preferences and self-selection into jobs: evidence from South African nurses," LSE Research Online Documents on Economics 85229, London School of Economics and Political Science, LSE Library.
    31. Maria Koumenta, 2015. "Public service motivation and organizational citizenship," Public Money & Management, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 35(5), pages 341-348, September.
    32. Banuri, Sheheryar & Keefer, Philip, 2013. "Intrinsic motivation, effort and the call to public service," Policy Research Working Paper Series 6729, The World Bank.
    33. Delfgaauw, Josse & Dur, Robert, 2010. "Managerial talent, motivation, and self-selection into public management," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(9-10), pages 654-660, October.
    34. Jussila Hammes , Johanna, 2017. "The impact of career concerns and cognitive dissonance on bureaucrats’ use of cost-benefit analysis," Working papers in Transport Economics 2017:5, CTS - Centre for Transport Studies Stockholm (KTH and VTI).
    35. Buurman, Margaretha & Dur, Robert & van den Bossche, Seth, 2009. "Public Sector Employees: Risk Averse and Altruistic?," IZA Discussion Papers 4401, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    36. Heinz, Matthias & Schumacher, Heiner, 2015. "Signaling cooperation," SAFE Working Paper Series 120, Leibniz Institute for Financial Research SAFE.
    37. F. Barigozzi & E. Manna, 2017. "Envy in Mission-Oriented Organizations," Working Papers wp1108, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    38. Tonin, Mirco & Vlassopoulos, Michael, 2010. "Disentangling the sources of pro-socially motivated effort: A field experiment," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 94(11-12), pages 1086-1092, December.
    39. Bryan, M.; & Roberts, J.; & Sechel, C.;, 2019. "The Effect of Mental Health on Employment:Accounting for Selection Bias," Health, Econometrics and Data Group (HEDG) Working Papers 19/14, HEDG, c/o Department of Economics, University of York.
    40. Peter Birch Sørensen, 2015. "Reforming Public Service Provision: What have we learned?," EPRU Working Paper Series 2015-01, Economic Policy Research Unit (EPRU), University of Copenhagen. Department of Economics.
    41. Mirco Tonin & Michael Vlassopoulos, 2015. "Corporate Philanthropy and Productivity: Evidence from an Online Real Effort Experiment," Management Science, INFORMS, vol. 61(8), pages 1795-1811, August.
    42. Adam Ayaita & Filiz Gülal & Philip Yang, 2019. "Where Does the Good Shepherd Go? Civic Virtue and Sorting into Public Sector Employment," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 20(4), pages 571-599, November.
    43. Josse Delfgaauw & Robert Dur, 2008. "Managerial Talent, Motivation, and Self-Selection into Public Management," CESifo Working Paper Series 2437, CESifo.
    44. Sheheryar Banuri & Philip Keefer, 2016. "Mellowing with Tenure? Socialization Increases Prosocial Behavior in Public Organizations," Research in Experimental Economics, in: Sebastian J. Goerg & John R. Hamman (ed.),Experiments in Organizational Economics, volume 19, pages 127-140, Emerald Publishing Ltd.
    45. Elena Granaglia, 2009. "The Homo Oeconomicus Paradigm and the Design of Public Policies. Some Underrated Issues," QA - Rivista dell'Associazione Rossi-Doria, Associazione Rossi Doria, issue 1, March.
    46. Carpenter, Jeffrey P. & Gong, Erick, 2013. "Motivating Agents: How Much Does the Mission Matter?," IZA Discussion Papers 7602, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    47. Andersson, Fredrik & Jordahl, Henrik & Josephson, Jens, 2019. "Outsourcing Public Services: Contractibility, Cost, and Quality," IZA Discussion Papers 12401, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    48. Robert Dur & Robin Zoutenbier, 2015. "Intrinsic Motivations of Public Sector Employees: Evidence for Germany," German Economic Review, Verein für Socialpolitik, vol. 16(3), pages 343-366, August.
    49. Lucia Rizzica, 2016. "Why go public? A study of the individual determinants of public sector employment choice," Questioni di Economia e Finanza (Occasional Papers) 343, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
    50. Heinz, Matthias & Schumacher, Heiner, 2016. "Signaling Cooperation," VfS Annual Conference 2016 (Augsburg): Demographic Change 145648, Verein für Socialpolitik / German Economic Association.
    51. Caroline Stiel, 2017. "Modern Public Enterprises: Organisational Innovation and Productivity," Discussion Papers of DIW Berlin 1713, DIW Berlin, German Institute for Economic Research.
    52. Mirco Tonin & Michael Vlassopoulos, 2014. "Corporate Philanthropy and Productivity: Evidence from an Online Real Effort Experiment," CESifo Working Paper Series 4778, CESifo.
    53. Florian H. Schneider & Fanny Brun & Roberto A. Weber, 2020. "Sorting and wage premiums in immoral work," ECON - Working Papers 353, Department of Economics - University of Zurich.
    54. Bruna Bruno & Damiano Fiorillo, 2014. "Voluntary work and wages," EERI Research Paper Series EERI RP 2014/05, Economics and Econometrics Research Institute (EERI), Brussels.
    55. Ghatak, Maitreesh & Mueller, Hannes, 2011. "Thanks for nothing? Not-for-profits and motivated agents," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(1), pages 94-105.
    56. Baul, Tushi, 2013. "Self-selection and peer-effects in experimental labor markets," ISU General Staff Papers 201301010800004327, Iowa State University, Department of Economics.
    57. Jeworrek, Sabrina & Mertins, Vanessa, 2019. "Mission, motivation, and the active decision to work for a social cause," IWH Discussion Papers 10/2019, Halle Institute for Economic Research (IWH).
    58. Andrej Gill & Matthias Heinz & Heiner Schumacher & Matthias Sutter, 2020. "Trustworthiness in the Financial Industry," CESifo Working Paper Series 8501, CESifo.
    59. Anne Boring & Claudine Desrieux & Romain Espinosa, 2018. "Aspiring Top Civil Servants' Distrust in the Private Sector [Méfiance envers le secteur privé des aspirants hauts fonctionnaires]," Post-Print halshs-01759358, HAL.
    60. Dijk, Oege & Holmén, Martin, 2017. "Charity, incentives, and performance," Journal of Behavioral and Experimental Economics (formerly The Journal of Socio-Economics), Elsevier, vol. 66(C), pages 119-128.
    61. F. Barigozzi & N. Burani, 2016. "Competition Between For-Profit and Non-Profit Firms: Incentives, Workers’ Self-Selection, and Wage Differentials," Working Papers wp1072, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    62. Joseph Lanfranchi & Sanja Pekovic, 2014. "How Green is my Firm? Workers' Attitudes and Behaviors towards Job in Environmentally Related Firms," Post-Print halshs-01081059, HAL.
    63. Joseph Lanfranchi & Mathieu Narcy, 2013. "Female Overrepresentation in Public and Nonprofit Sector Jobs [Evidence From a French National Survey]," Post-Print halshs-01081038, HAL.
    64. Valasek, Justin, 2018. "Dynamic reform of public institutions: A model of motivated agents and collective reputation," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 168(C), pages 94-108.
    65. Gill, Andrej & Heinz, Matthias & Schumacher, Heiner, 2014. "Trust, trustworthiness and selection into the financial industry," CFS Working Paper Series 458, Center for Financial Studies (CFS).
    66. Feng, Y. & Farrar, S. & Sutton, M. & May, A., 2011. "The Effect of an Increase in the Rate of Payment on General Practitioner's Intrinsic and Extrinsic Motivation," Research Papers 000175, Office of Health Economics.
    67. Mbiti, Isaac M. & Serra, Danila, 2018. "Health Workers' Behavior, Patient Reporting and Reputational Concerns: Lab-in-the-Field Experimental Evidence from Kenya," IZA Discussion Papers 11352, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    68. Kimiko Terai & Amihai Glazer, 2015. "Principal-Agent Problems When Principal Allocates a Budget," Keio-IES Discussion Paper Series 2015-012, Institute for Economics Studies, Keio University.
    69. Banuri, Sheheryar & Keefer, Philip, 2016. "Pro-social motivation, effort and the call to public service," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 83(C), pages 139-164.
    70. Jones, Daniel B., 2015. "The supply and demand of motivated labor: When should we expect to see nonprofit wage gaps?," Labour Economics, Elsevier, vol. 32(C), pages 1-14.
    71. Mirco Tonin & Michael Vlassopoulos, 2009. "Disentangling the sources of pro-social behavior in the workplace: A field experiment," Natural Field Experiments 00313, The Field Experiments Website.
    72. Karine Nyborg, 2014. "Do responsible employers attract responsible employees?," IZA World of Labor, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA), pages 1-17, May.
    73. F. Barigozzi & N. Burani, 2014. "Competition and Screening with Skilled and Motivated Workers," Working Papers wp953, Dipartimento Scienze Economiche, Universita' di Bologna.
    74. Gerhards, Leonie, 2015. "The incentive effects of missions—Evidence from experiments with NGO employees and students," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 79(C), pages 252-262.
    75. Echeverría, Manuel, 2012. "Value Oriented Organizations with Value Neutral Hierarchies," Working Papers 2012:25, Lund University, Department of Economics.
    76. Baert, Stijn & Vujic, Suncica, 2016. "Does It Pay to Care? Prosocial Engagement and Employment Opportunities," IZA Discussion Papers 9649, Institute of Labor Economics (IZA).
    77. Margaretha Buurman & Josse Delfgaauw & Robert Dur & Seth Van den Bossche, 2012. "Public Sector Employees: Risk Averse and Altruistic?," CESifo Working Paper Series 3851, CESifo.
    78. Robert Dur & Robin Zoutenbier, 2013. "Working for a Good Cause," CESifo Working Paper Series 4227, CESifo.
    79. Platt, Lucinda & Sunkin, Maurice & Calvo, Kerman, 2009. "Judicial review litigation as an incentive to change in local authority public services in England and Wales," ISER Working Paper Series 2009-05, Institute for Social and Economic Research.
    80. Peter Dolton & Gerald Makepeace & Oscar Marcenaro-Gutierrez, 2015. "Public Sector Pay in the UK: Quantifying the Impact of the Review Bodies," Manchester School, University of Manchester, vol. 83(6), pages 701-724, December.
    81. Rhea Molato, 2015. "Public-Private Wage Differentials and the Quality of Government Workers in the Philippines," Working Papers tax-mpg-rps-2015-06, Max Planck Institute for Tax Law and Public Finance.
    82. Mirco Tonin & Michael Vlassopoulos, 2009. "Disentangling the Sources of Pro-social Behavior in the Workplace: A Field Experiment," CESifo Working Paper Series 2757, CESifo.
    83. Robert Dur & Robin Zoutenbier, 2013. "Intrinsic Motivations of Public Sector Employees: Evidence for Germany," CESifo Working Paper Series 4276, CESifo.
    84. Stijn Baert & Sunčica Vujić, 2018. "Does it pay to care? Volunteering and employment opportunities," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 31(3), pages 819-836, July.
    85. Valasek, Justin, 2015. "Reforming an institutional culture of corruption: A model of motivated agents and collective reputation," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Economics of Change SP II 2015-303, WZB Berlin Social Science Center.
    86. Heinz, Matthias & Schumacher, Heiner, 2015. "Signaling Cooperation," CEPR Discussion Papers 10942, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    87. Juan Camilo Cardenas & Rajiv Sethi, 2010. "Resource Allocation in Public Agencies: Experimental Evidence," Journal of Public Economic Theory, Association for Public Economic Theory, vol. 12(4), pages 815-836, August.
    88. Athias, Laure & Macina, Moudo & Wicht, Pascal, 2017. "Public Private Partnerships: The Swiss Specificity," MPRA Paper 84131, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    89. Yannis Georgellis & Elisabetta Iossa & Vurain Tabvuma, 2008. "Crowding Out Public Service Motivation," CEDI Discussion Paper Series 08-07, Centre for Economic Development and Institutions(CEDI), Brunel University.
    90. Florian H. Schneider & Fanny Brun & Roberto A. Weber, 2020. "Sorting and Wage Premiums in Immoral Work," CESifo Working Paper Series 8456, CESifo.

  7. Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah Smith, 2006. "Fertility and Women’s Education in the UK: A Cohort Analysis," The Centre for Market and Public Organisation 07/165, The Centre for Market and Public Organisation, University of Bristol, UK.

    Cited by:

    1. Aldieri, Luigi & Vinci, Concetto Paolo, 2010. "An investigation of the relation between the number of children and education in Italy," MPRA Paper 28534, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    2. Ian Dey & Fran Wasoff, 2010. "Another Child? Fertility Ideals, Resources and Opportunities," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer;Southern Demographic Association (SDA), vol. 29(6), pages 921-940, December.
    3. Dylan Kneale & Heather Joshi, 2008. "Postponement and childlessness - Evidence from two British cohorts," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 19(58), pages 1935-1968.
    4. Paul Mathews & Rebecca Sear, 2013. "Does the kin orientation of a British woman’s social network influence her entry into motherhood?," Demographic Research, Max Planck Institute for Demographic Research, Rostock, Germany, vol. 28(11), pages 313-340.
    5. Raute, Anna, 2019. "Can financial incentives reduce the baby gap? Evidence from a reform in maternity leave benefits," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 169(C), pages 203-222.

Articles

  1. Anita Ratcliffe & Karl Taylor, 2015. "Who cares about stock market booms and busts? Evidence from data on mental health," Oxford Economic Papers, Oxford University Press, vol. 67(3), pages 826-845.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  2. Anita Ratcliffe & Stephanie von Hinke Kessler Scholder, 2015. "The London Bombings And Racial Prejudice: Evidence From The Housing And Labor Market," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 53(1), pages 276-293, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  3. Richard Disney & Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah Smith, 2015. "Booms, Busts and Retirement Timing," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 82(327), pages 399-419, July.

    Cited by:

    1. Renata Bottazzi & Serena Trucchi & Matthew Wakefield, 2017. "Labour supply responses to financial wealth shocks: evidence from Italy," IFS Working Papers W17/29, Institute for Fiscal Studies.
    2. Lingxiao Zhao & Gregory Burge, 2017. "Housing Wealth, Property Taxes, and Labor Supply among the Elderly," Journal of Labor Economics, University of Chicago Press, vol. 35(1), pages 227-263.
    3. Richard Disney & John Gathergood, 2018. "House Prices, Wealth Effects and Labour Supply," Economica, London School of Economics and Political Science, vol. 85(339), pages 449-478, July.
    4. Leora Friedberg & Michael T. Owyang & Wei Sun & Anthony Webb, 2017. "How Do Local Labor Markets Affect Retirement?," Review, Federal Reserve Bank of St. Louis, vol. 99(3), pages 259-278.

  4. Mike Brewer & Anita Ratcliffe & Sarah dSmith, 2012. "Does welfare reform affect fertility? Evidence from the UK," Journal of Population Economics, Springer;European Society for Population Economics, vol. 25(1), pages 245-266, January.
    See citations under working paper version above.
  5. Gregg, Paul & Grout, Paul A. & Ratcliffe, Anita & Smith, Sarah & Windmeijer, Frank, 2011. "How important is pro-social behaviour in the delivery of public services?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 95(7-8), pages 758-766, August.
    See citations under working paper version above.

More information

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Statistics

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Co-authorship network on CollEc

NEP Fields

NEP is an announcement service for new working papers, with a weekly report in each of many fields. This author has had 7 papers announced in NEP. These are the fields, ordered by number of announcements, along with their dates. If the author is listed in the directory of specialists for this field, a link is also provided.
  1. NEP-URE: Urban & Real Estate Economics (3) 2010-04-24 2012-05-29 2013-10-02
  2. NEP-HAP: Economics of Happiness (2) 2009-04-05 2010-04-24
  3. NEP-HEA: Health Economics (2) 2012-05-29 2012-10-06
  4. NEP-LTV: Unemployment, Inequality & Poverty (2) 2007-03-10 2008-08-14
  5. NEP-CBE: Cognitive & Behavioural Economics (1) 2008-08-14
  6. NEP-DEM: Demographic Economics (1) 2013-10-02
  7. NEP-EDU: Education (1) 2007-03-10
  8. NEP-EEC: European Economics (1) 2007-03-10
  9. NEP-NEU: Neuroeconomics (1) 2010-04-24
  10. NEP-PBE: Public Economics (1) 2008-08-14

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