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Better sexy than flexy? A lab experiment assessing the impact of perceived attractiveness and personality traits on hiring decisions

  • S. BAERT

    ()

  • L. DECUYPERE

In this letter we present a laboratory experiment to assess the relative and independent effect of perceived attractiveness and personality traits on hiring decisions. Our results indicate that attractiveness and conscientiousness, followed by emotional stability, are important drivers of recruiters’ decisions.

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File URL: http://wps-feb.ugent.be/Papers/wp_13_868.pdf
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Paper provided by Ghent University, Faculty of Economics and Business Administration in its series Working Papers of Faculty of Economics and Business Administration, Ghent University, Belgium with number 13/868.

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Length: 11 pages
Date of creation: Dec 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:rug:rugwps:13/868
Contact details of provider: Postal: Hoveniersberg 4, B-9000 Gent
Phone: ++ 32 (0) 9 264 34 61
Fax: ++ 32 (0) 9 264 35 92
Web page: http://www.ugent.be/eb

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  1. Philip K. Robins & Jenny F. Homer & Michael T. French, 2011. "Beauty and the Labor Market: Accounting for the Additional Effects of Personality and Grooming," LABOUR, CEIS, vol. 25(2), pages 228-251, 06.
  2. Daniel S. Hamermesh & Jeff E. Biddle, 1993. "Beauty and the Labor Market," NBER Working Papers 4518, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  3. Armin Falk & Stephan Meier & Christian Zehnder, 2013. "Do Lab Experiments Misrepresent Social Preferences? The Case Of Self-Selected Student Samples," Journal of the European Economic Association, European Economic Association, vol. 11(4), pages 839-852, 08.
  4. Chang, Hung-Hao & Weng, Yungho, 2012. "What is more important for prostitute price? Physical appearance or risky sex behavior?," Economics Letters, Elsevier, vol. 117(2), pages 480-483.
  5. Guido Heineck, 2011. "Does It Pay To Be Nice? Personality And Earnings In The UK," Industrial and Labor Relations Review, ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 64(5), pages 1020-1038, October.
  6. Gerrit Mueller & Erik Plug, 2006. "Estimating the Effect of Personality on Male and Female Earnings," ILR Review, Cornell University, ILR School, vol. 60(1), pages 3-22, October.
  7. Christian Pfeifer, 2011. "Physical Attractiveness, Employment, and Earnings," Working Paper Series in Economics 201, University of Lüneburg, Institute of Economics.
  8. Uysal, Selver Derya & Pohlmeier, Winfried, 2011. "Unemployment duration and personality," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 32(6), pages 980-992.
  9. Samuel Cameron & Alan Collins, 1999. "Looks unimportant? A demand function for male attractiveness by female personal advertisers," Applied Economics Letters, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 6(6), pages 381-384.
  10. Andreoni, James & Petrie, Ragan, 2008. "Beauty, gender and stereotypes: Evidence from laboratory experiments," Journal of Economic Psychology, Elsevier, vol. 29(1), pages 73-93, February.
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