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Online Appendix to "Unobserved Heterogeneity and Skill Loss in a Structural Model of Duration Dependence"

Author

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  • Ioannis Kospentaris

    (Virginia Commonwealth University)

Abstract

Online appendix for the Review of Economic Dynamics article

Suggested Citation

  • Ioannis Kospentaris, 2020. "Online Appendix to "Unobserved Heterogeneity and Skill Loss in a Structural Model of Duration Dependence"," Online Appendices 19-483, Review of Economic Dynamics.
  • Handle: RePEc:red:append:19-483
    Note: The original article was published in the Review of Economic Dynamics
    as

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    File URL: https://www.economicdynamics.org/appendix/19/19-483/19-483.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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