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The Intensity of Job Search and Search Duration

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Abstract

We use panel data on individual applications to job openings on a job search website to study search intensity and search duration. Our data allow us to control for the composition of job seekers and changes in the number of available job openings over the duration of search. We find that (1) the number of applications sent by a job seeker declines over the duration of search, and (2) longer-duration job seekers send relatively more applications per week throughout their entire search. The latter finding contradicts the implications of standard labor search models. We argue that these models fail to capture an income effect in search effort that causes job seekers with the lowest returns to search to exert the highest effort. We present evidence in support of this idea.

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  • Faberman, R. Jason & Kudlyak, Marianna, 2016. "The Intensity of Job Search and Search Duration," Working Paper Series 2016-13, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco.
  • Handle: RePEc:fip:fedfwp:2016-13
    DOI: 10.24148/wp2016-13
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Belot, Michele & Kircher, Philipp & Muller, Paul, 2015. "Providing Advice to Job Seekers at Low Cost: An Experimental Study on On-Line Advice," Working Papers in Economics 637, University of Gothenburg, Department of Economics.
    2. Marinescu, Ioana E. & Wolthoff, Ronald P., 2015. "Opening the Black Box of the Matching Function: The Power of Words," IZA Discussion Papers 9071, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    3. Ludo Visschers & Carlos Carrillo-Tudela, 2011. "Unemployment and Endogenous Reallocation over the Business Cycle," 2011 Meeting Papers 1101, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    4. Marianna Kudlyak & Damba Lkhagvasuren & Roman Sysuyev, 2012. "Sorting by skill over the course of job search," Working Paper 12-03, Federal Reserve Bank of Richmond.
    5. Fabo, B., 2017. "Towards an understanding of job matching using web data," Other publications TiSEM b8b877f2-ae6a-495f-b6cc-9, Tilburg University, School of Economics and Management.
    6. Carrillo-Tudela, Carlos & Hobijn, Bart & She, Powen & Visschers, Ludo, 2016. "The extent and cyclicality of career changes: Evidence for the U.K," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 84(C), pages 18-41.
    7. Hornstein, Andreas & Kudlyak, Marianna, 2015. "Estimating Matching Efficiency with Variable Search Effort," Working Paper Series 2016-24, Federal Reserve Bank of San Francisco, revised 06 Dec 2016.
    8. repec:bla:scotjp:v:65:y:2018:i:2:p:105-126 is not listed on IDEAS
    9. Carl Singleton, 2016. "Long-term unemployment and the Great Recession: Evidence from UK stocks and flows," ESE Discussion Papers 273, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    10. Carlos Carrillo-Tudela & Bart Hobijn & Powen She & Ludo Visschers, 2014. "The Extent and Cyclicality of Career Changes: Evidence for the UK (first version)," ESE Discussion Papers 246, Edinburgh School of Economics, University of Edinburgh.
    11. Mazur, Karol, 2016. "Can welfare abuse be welfare improving?," Journal of Public Economics, Elsevier, vol. 141(C), pages 11-28.
    12. Ronald Wolthoff, 2018. "Applications and Interviews: Firms’ Recruiting Decisions in a Frictional Labour Market," Review of Economic Studies, Oxford University Press, vol. 85(2), pages 1314-1351.
    13. repec:aea:aejmac:v:10:y:2018:i:1:p:190-215 is not listed on IDEAS
    14. Toshihiko Mukoyama & Christina Patterson & Ayşegül Şahin, 2018. "Job Search Behavior over the Business Cycle," American Economic Journal: Macroeconomics, American Economic Association, vol. 10(1), pages 190-215, January.

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • E24 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Consumption, Saving, Production, Employment, and Investment - - - Employment; Unemployment; Wages; Intergenerational Income Distribution; Aggregate Human Capital; Aggregate Labor Productivity
    • J24 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Demand and Supply of Labor - - - Human Capital; Skills; Occupational Choice; Labor Productivity
    • J31 - Labor and Demographic Economics - - Wages, Compensation, and Labor Costs - - - Wage Level and Structure; Wage Differentials

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