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Who Supports the ECB? Evidence from Eurobarometer Survey Data

Author

Listed:
  • Etienne Farvaque

    () (Department of Economics, University of Lille 1)

  • Muhammad Azmat Hayat

    () (Department of Economics, University of Lille 1)

  • Alexander Mihailov

    () (Department of Economics, University of Reading)

Abstract

This paper addresses empirically the still debated issue of the legitimacy of the European Central Bank (ECB) with regard to European polities, presenting evidence on public opinion support for the ECB as elicited from responses in the recent waves of the Eurobarometer survey. We employ a rich set of potential determinants, combining macroeconomic and socio-demographic data in logistic regressions, to explain trust in the ECB. We find that people with higher level of income and education and centre to right-wing political orientation tend to support the ECB, as well as people with optimistic expectations on the economic situation. Moreover, our results indicate that socio-demographic determinants of trust in the ECB dominate macroeconomic ones, in particular inflation performance, by a considerable margin of magnitude and in a quite robust way. The policy relevance of such results is important for ECB’s communication strategy with the EU public, especially in the years ahead of likely reforms of the European Monetary Union (EMU).

Suggested Citation

  • Etienne Farvaque & Muhammad Azmat Hayat & Alexander Mihailov, 2011. "Who Supports the ECB? Evidence from Eurobarometer Survey Data," Economics & Management Discussion Papers em-dp2011-04, Henley Business School, Reading University.
  • Handle: RePEc:rdg:emxxdp:em-dp2011-04
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    File URL: http://www.reading.ac.uk/web/FILES/economics/emdp2011092.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Philip Arestis & Alexander Mihailov, 2007. "Flexible Rules cum Constrained Discretion: A New Consensus in Monetary Policy," Economic Analysis Research Group Working Papers earg-wp2007-13, Henley Business School, Reading University.
    2. Charles T Carlstrom & Timothy S Fuerst, 2009. "Central Bank Independence And Inflation: A Note," Economic Inquiry, Western Economic Association International, vol. 47(1), pages 182-186, January.
    3. Alan S. Blinder & Michael Ehrmann & Marcel Fratzscher & Jakob De Haan & David-Jan Jansen, 2008. "Central Bank Communication and Monetary Policy: A Survey of Theory and Evidence," Journal of Economic Literature, American Economic Association, vol. 46(4), pages 910-945, December.
    4. P Arestis & A Mihailov, 2009. "Flexible Rules cum Constrained Discretion: A New Consensus in Monetary Policy," Economic Issues Journal Articles, Economic Issues, vol. 14(2), pages 27-54, September.
    5. George A. Akerlof & William R. Dickens & George L. Perry, 1996. "The Macroeconomics of Low Inflation," Brookings Papers on Economic Activity, Economic Studies Program, The Brookings Institution, vol. 27(1), pages 1-76.
    6. Ben S. Bernanke & Frederic S. Mishkin, 1997. "Inflation Targeting: A New Framework for Monetary Policy?," Journal of Economic Perspectives, American Economic Association, vol. 11(2), pages 97-116, Spring.
    7. Marco Arnone & Bernard J Laurens & Jean-François Segalotto & Martin Sommer, 2009. "Central Bank Autonomy: Lessons from Global Trends," IMF Staff Papers, Palgrave Macmillan, vol. 56(2), pages 263-296, June.
    8. Filippo Altissimo & Pierpaolo Benigno & Diego Palenzuela, 2011. "Inflation Differentials in a Currency Area: Facts, Explanations and Policy," Open Economies Review, Springer, vol. 22(2), pages 189-233, April.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Hayo, Bernd & Neuenkirch, Edith, 2014. "The German public and its trust in the ECB: The role of knowledge and information search," Journal of International Money and Finance, Elsevier, vol. 47(C), pages 286-303.
    2. Etienne Farvaque & Muhammad Azmat Hayat & Alexander Mihailov, 2017. "Who Supports the ECB? Evidence from Eurobarometer Survey Data," The World Economy, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 40(4), pages 654-677, April.
    3. Bernd Hayo & Florian Neumeier, 2017. "Explaining Central Bank Trust in an Inflation Targeting Country: The Case of the Reserve Bank of New Zealand," ifo Working Paper Series 236, ifo Institute - Leibniz Institute for Economic Research at the University of Munich.
    4. Roth, Felix & Gros, Daniel & Nowak-Lehmann D., Felicitas, 2012. "Has the financial crisis eroded citizens' trust in the European Central Bank? Panel data evidence for the Euro area, 1999-2011," Center for European, Governance and Economic Development Research Discussion Papers 124, University of Goettingen, Department of Economics.
    5. Maciej Albinowski & Piotr Ciżkowicz & Andrzej Rzońca, 2014. "Links between trust in the ECB and its interest rate policy," Applied Economics, Taylor & Francis Journals, vol. 46(25), pages 3090-3106, September.
    6. Torój, Andrzej & Bednarek, Elżbieta & Bęza-Bojanowska, Joanna & Osińska, Joanna & Waćko, Katarzyna & Witkowski, Dariusz, 2012. "EMU: the (post-)crisis perspective. Literature survey and implications for the euro-candidates," MF Working Papers 12, Ministry of Finance in Poland, revised 06 Mar 2012.
    7. repec:got:cegedp:124 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    Keywords

    European Central Bank; communication; legitimacy; determinants of trust; Eurobarometer survey; logistic regression;

    JEL classification:

    • C23 - Mathematical and Quantitative Methods - - Single Equation Models; Single Variables - - - Models with Panel Data; Spatio-temporal Models
    • E58 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Monetary Policy, Central Banking, and the Supply of Money and Credit - - - Central Banks and Their Policies
    • F33 - International Economics - - International Finance - - - International Monetary Arrangements and Institutions
    • H11 - Public Economics - - Structure and Scope of Government - - - Structure and Scope of Government
    • Z13 - Other Special Topics - - Cultural Economics - - - Economic Sociology; Economic Anthropology; Language; Social and Economic Stratification

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