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Forecasting national activity using lots of international predictors: an application to New Zealand

This paper examines the relationship between wages and consumer prices in New Zealand over the last 15 years. Reflecting the open nature of the New Zealand economy, the headline CPI is disaggregated into non-tradable and tradable prices. We find that there is a joint causality between wages and disaggregate inflation. An increase in wage inflation forecasts an increase in non-tradable inflation. However, it is tradable inflation that drives wage inflation. While exogenous shocks to wages do not help to forecast inflation, the leading relationship from wages to non-tradable inflation implies that monitoring wages may prove useful for projecting the impact of other shocks on future inflation.

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File URL: http://rbnz.govt.nz/research_and_publications/discussion_papers/2009/dp09_04.pdf
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Paper provided by Reserve Bank of New Zealand in its series Reserve Bank of New Zealand Discussion Paper Series with number DP2009/04.

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Length: 54p
Date of creation: May 2009
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:nzb:nzbdps:2009/04
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