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The Macroeconomics of Microfinance

Author

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  • Francisco J. Buera
  • Joseph P. Kaboski
  • Yongseok Shin

Abstract

We provide a quantitative evaluation of the aggregate and distributional impact of microfinance or credit programs targeted toward small businesses. We find that the redistributive impact of microfinance is stronger in general equilibrium than in partial equilibrium, but the impact on aggregate output and capital is smaller in general equilibrium. Aggregate total factor productivity (TFP) increases with microfinance in general equilibrium but decreases in partial equilibrium. When general equilibrium effects are accounted for, scaling up the microfinance program will have only a small impact on per-capita income, because the increase in TFP is counterbalanced by lower capital accumulation resulting from the redistribution of income from high-savers to low-savers. Nevertheless, the vast majority of the population will be positively affected by microfinance through the increase in equilibrium wages.

Suggested Citation

  • Francisco J. Buera & Joseph P. Kaboski & Yongseok Shin, 2012. "The Macroeconomics of Microfinance," NBER Working Papers 17905, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  • Handle: RePEc:nbr:nberwo:17905
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    Cited by:

    1. Oriana Bandiera & Robin Burgess & Narayan Das & Selim Gulesci & Imran Rasul & Munshi Sulaiman, 2013. "Can Basic Entrepreneurship Transform the Economic Lives of the Poor?," STICERD - Economic Organisation and Public Policy Discussion Papers Series 043, Suntory and Toyota International Centres for Economics and Related Disciplines, LSE.
    2. Sane Renuka & Thomas Susan, 2016. "The Real Cost of Credit Constraints: Evidence from Micro-finance," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 16(1), pages 151-183, January.
    3. António Antunes & Tiago Cavalcanti & Anne Villamil, 2015. "The effects of credit subsidies on development," Economic Theory, Springer;Society for the Advancement of Economic Theory (SAET), vol. 58(1), pages 1-30, January.
    4. Demont, Timothée, 2016. "Microfinance spillovers: A model of competition in informal credit markets with an application to Indian villages," European Economic Review, Elsevier, vol. 89(C), pages 21-41.
    5. Raihan, Selim & Osmani, S.R. & Khalily, M.A. Baqui, 2017. "The macro impact of microfinance in Bangladesh: A CGE analysis," Economic Modelling, Elsevier, vol. 62(C), pages 1-15.
    6. Kevin Donovan, 2014. "Subsistence Entrepreneurs and Misallocation," 2014 Meeting Papers 771, Society for Economic Dynamics.
    7. Alimukhamedova, Nargiza & Hanousek, Jan, 2015. "What Do We Know about Microfinance at Macro Glance?," CEPR Discussion Papers 10484, C.E.P.R. Discussion Papers.
    8. Baldi, Guido & Sadovskis, Vairis & Šipilova, Viktorija, 2014. "Economic and Employment Effects of Microloans in a Transition Country," MPRA Paper 52736, University Library of Munich, Germany.
    9. repec:eee:ecmode:v:69:y:2018:i:c:p:91-102 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. repec:eee:quaeco:v:64:y:2017:i:c:p:44-56 is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • D91 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Role and Effects of Psychological, Emotional, Social, and Cognitive Factors on Decision Making
    • D92 - Microeconomics - - Micro-Based Behavioral Economics - - - Intertemporal Firm Choice, Investment, Capacity, and Financing
    • E44 - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics - - Money and Interest Rates - - - Financial Markets and the Macroeconomy
    • O11 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Development - - - Macroeconomic Analyses of Economic Development

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