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A structural econometric analysis of the informal sector heterogeneity

  • Nguimkeu, Pierre

Understanding the informal sector – that represents about 60–90% of urban employment in developing countries – has a significant importance for any strategy and policy interventions aiming to alleviate poverty and improve welfare. I formulate and estimate a model of entrepreneurial choice to address the heterogeneity in occupations and earnings observed within the informal sector. I test the implications of the model with reduced form and nonparametric techniques, and use a structural econometric approach to empirically identify occupational patterns and earnings using data from the Cameroon informal sector. The empirical validity of the structural estimates is tested and the estimated model is used in counterfactual policy simulations to show how microfinance and business training programs can strengthen the efficiency of the informal sector and substantially improve its earning potential.

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Article provided by Elsevier in its journal Journal of Development Economics.

Volume (Year): 107 (2014)
Issue (Month): C ()
Pages: 175-191

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Handle: RePEc:eee:deveco:v:107:y:2014:i:c:p:175-191
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.elsevier.com/locate/devec

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