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The expansion of modern agriculture and global biodiversity decline: an integrated assessment

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  • Bruno Lanz
  • Simon Dietz
  • Tim Swanson

Abstract

Modern agriculture relies on a small number of highly productive crops and its continued expansion has led to a significant loss of biodiversity. In this paper we consider the macroeconomic consequences of this land conversion process from the perspective of agricultural productivity and food production. We employ a quantitative, structurally estimated model of the global economy in which economic growth, population and food demand, agricultural innovations, and land conversion are jointly determined. We show that even a small impact of global biodiversity on agricultural productivity calls for both a halt in agricultural land conversion and increased agricultural R&D.

Suggested Citation

  • Bruno Lanz & Simon Dietz & Tim Swanson, 2016. "The expansion of modern agriculture and global biodiversity decline: an integrated assessment," GRI Working Papers 167, Grantham Research Institute on Climate Change and the Environment.
  • Handle: RePEc:lsg:lsgwps:wp167
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    Cited by:

    1. Bruno Lanz & Simon Dietz & Tim Swanson, 2016. "Economic growth and agricultural land conversion under uncertain productivity improvements in agriculture," FOODSECURE Working papers 53, LEI Wageningen UR.
    2. repec:oup:ajagec:v:100:y:2018:i:2:p:545-569. is not listed on IDEAS

    More about this item

    JEL classification:

    • N10 - Economic History - - Macroeconomics and Monetary Economics; Industrial Structure; Growth; Fluctuations - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • N50 - Economic History - - Agriculture, Natural Resources, Environment and Extractive Industries - - - General, International, or Comparative
    • O31 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Innovation; Research and Development; Technological Change; Intellectual Property Rights - - - Innovation and Invention: Processes and Incentives
    • O44 - Economic Development, Innovation, Technological Change, and Growth - - Economic Growth and Aggregate Productivity - - - Environment and Growth
    • Q15 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - Land Ownership and Tenure; Land Reform; Land Use; Irrigation; Agriculture and Environment
    • Q16 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Agriculture - - - R&D; Agricultural Technology; Biofuels; Agricultural Extension Services
    • Q57 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Environmental Economics - - - Ecological Economics

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