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Rolling the 'Dice': An Optimal Transition Path for Controlling Greenhouse Gases

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Abstract

The possibility of greenhouse warming has received growing attention in recent years. Many scientific bodies are calling for severe curbs on the emissions of greenhouse gases. To date, the calls to arms and treaty negotiations have progressed more or less independently of economic studies of the costs and benefits of measures to slow greenhouse warming. The plan of the present study is to develop a dynamic, global model of both the impacts of and policies to slow global warming. It is an integral model that incorporates both the dynamics of emissions and impacts and the economic costs of policies to curb emissions.

Suggested Citation

  • William D. Nordhaus, 1992. "Rolling the 'Dice': An Optimal Transition Path for Controlling Greenhouse Gases," Cowles Foundation Discussion Papers 1019, Cowles Foundation for Research in Economics, Yale University.
  • Handle: RePEc:cwl:cwldpp:1019
    Note: CFP 836.
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. Alan S. Manne & Richard G. Richels, 1990. "CO2 Emission Limits: An Economic Cost Analysis for the USA," The Energy Journal, International Association for Energy Economics, vol. 0(Number 2), pages 51-74.
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    More about this item

    Keywords

    Global warming; environmental regulation; cost-benefit;
    All these keywords.

    JEL classification:

    • Q28 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Government Policy
    • Q25 - Agricultural and Natural Resource Economics; Environmental and Ecological Economics - - Renewable Resources and Conservation - - - Water

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