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Report No. 56: Labour Migration from EaP Countries to the EU – Assessment of Costs and Benefits and Proposals for Better Labour Market Matching

  • Kahanec, Martin

    ()

    (Central European University)

  • Zimmermann, Klaus F.

    ()

    (IZA and University of Bonn)

  • Kureková, Lucia Mýtna

    ()

    (Slovak Governance Institute)

  • Biavaschi, Costanza

    ()

    (University of Reading)

Report based on a study conducted for the European Commission, Bonn 2013 (164 pages)

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File URL: http://www.iza.org/en/webcontent/publications/reports/report_pdfs/iza_report_56.pdf
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Paper provided by Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA) in its series IZA Research Reports with number 56.

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Date of creation: 30 Aug 2013
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Handle: RePEc:iza:izarrs:56
Contact details of provider: Postal: IZA, P.O. Box 7240, D-53072 Bonn, Germany
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Fax: +49 228 3894 180
Web page: http://www.iza.org

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  1. Hatton, Timothy J, 1995. "A Model of U.K. Emigration, 1870-1913," The Review of Economics and Statistics, MIT Press, vol. 77(3), pages 407-15, August.
  2. Neugart, Michael & Schömann, Klaus, 2002. "Employment outlooks: Why forecast the labour market and for whom?," Discussion Papers, Research Unit: Labor Market Policy and Employment FS I 02-206, Social Science Research Center Berlin (WZB).
  3. Tommaso Frattini, 2012. "Immigrazione," Rivista di Politica Economica, SIPI Spa, issue 3, pages 363-407, July-Sept.
  4. repec:nsr:niesrd:379 is not listed on IDEAS
  5. Luca Barbone & Mikhail Bonch-Osmolovskiyi & Matthias Luecke, 2013. "Labour Migration from the Eastern Partnership Countries: Evolution and Policy Options for Better Outcomes," CASE Network Reports 0113, CASE-Center for Social and Economic Research.
  6. George J. Borjas, 1998. "Immigration and Welfare Magnets," NBER Working Papers 6813, National Bureau of Economic Research, Inc.
  7. Gianmarco I.P. Ottaviano & Giovanni Peri, 2004. "The Economic Value of Cultural Diversity: Evidence from US Cities," Working Papers 2004.34, Fondazione Eni Enrico Mattei.
  8. Paweł Kaczmarczyk & Marek Okólski, 2008. "Demographic and labour-market impacts of migration on Poland," Oxford Review of Economic Policy, Oxford University Press, vol. 24(3), pages 600-625, Autumn.
  9. Rebecca Riley & Ray Barrell, 2007. "EU enlargement and migration: Assessing the macroeconomic impacts," NIESR Discussion Papers 1491, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  10. Constant, Amelie F. & Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2008. "Attitudes towards Immigrants, Other Integration Barriers, and Their Veracity," IZA Discussion Papers 3650, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Chiswick, Carmel U. & Chiswick, Barry R. & Karras, Georgios, 1992. "The impact of immigrants on the macroeconomy," Carnegie-Rochester Conference Series on Public Policy, Elsevier, vol. 37(1), pages 279-316, December.
  12. Francesc Ortega & Libertad González & Lídia Farré Olalla, 2009. "Immigration, family responsibilities and the labor supply of skilled native women," Working Papers. Serie AD 2009-19, Instituto Valenciano de Investigaciones Económicas, S.A. (Ivie).
  13. Mayr Karin & Peri Giovanni, 2009. "Brain Drain and Brain Return: Theory and Application to Eastern-Western Europe," The B.E. Journal of Economic Analysis & Policy, De Gruyter, vol. 9(1), pages 1-52, November.
  14. Guglielmo Barone & Sauro Mocetti, 2010. "With a little help from abroad: the effect of low-skilled immigration on the female labor supply," Temi di discussione (Economic working papers) 766, Bank of Italy, Economic Research and International Relations Area.
  15. Nigel Pain & Dr Martin Weale & Dr Garry Young, 1997. "BritainÕs fiscal problems," NIESR Discussion Papers 224, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  16. Barrell, Ray & Dawn Holland & Nigel Pain, 2002. "An Econometric Macro-model of Transition: Policy Choices in the Pre-Accession Period," Royal Economic Society Annual Conference 2002 15, Royal Economic Society.
  17. Michael Fertig, 2001. "The economic impact of EU-enlargement: assessing the migration potential," Empirical Economics, Springer, vol. 26(4), pages 707-720.
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