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Labour mobility within the EU

Author

Listed:
  • Dr Tatiana Fic

    ()

  • Ana Rincon-Aznar

    ()

  • Lucy Stokes

    ()

  • Dawn Holland

    ()

Abstract

The main focus of this study is an assessment of the macro-economic impact on both host and home countries of the increased labour mobility that has resulted from the two recent EU enlargements. We first look at the macro-economic impact of the total population flows from the EU-8 and EU-2 to the EU-15 economies between 2004 and 2009, adjusting for the age structure and education level of the mobile population. We then attempt to quantify the share of population movements that have occurred since 2004 and 2007 that can be attributed to the enlargement process itself, and the share that is likely to have occurred even in the absence of EU expansion. We finally look at the impact that transitional restrictions on the free mobility of labour have had on the distribution of EU-8 and EU-2 citizens across the EU-15 countries.

Suggested Citation

  • Dr Tatiana Fic & Ana Rincon-Aznar & Lucy Stokes & Dawn Holland, 2011. "Labour mobility within the EU," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 379, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
  • Handle: RePEc:nsr:niesrd:2952
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    File URL: http://www.niesr.ac.uk/sites/default/files/publications/dp379.pdf
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    References listed on IDEAS

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    1. repec:sae:niesru:v:160:y::i:1:p:63-75 is not listed on IDEAS
    2. Nigel Pain, 1997. "Export performance and and the role of foreign direct investment," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 131, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    3. Ray Barrell & John Fitzgerald & Rebecca Riley, 2010. "EU Enlargement and Migration: Assessing the Macroeconomic Impacts," Journal of Common Market Studies, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 48, pages 373-395, March.
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    Citations

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    Cited by:

    1. Skupnik, Christoph, 2013. ""Welfare magnetism" in the EU-15? Why the EU enlargement did not start a race to the bottom of welfare states," Discussion Papers 2013/8, Free University Berlin, School of Business & Economics.
    2. Ieva Brauksa & Ludmila Fadejeva, 2013. "Internal Labour Market Mobility in 2005-2011: The Case of Latvia," Working Papers 2013/02, Latvijas Banka.
    3. Andrén, Daniela & Roman, Monica, 2014. "Should I Stay or Should I Go? Romanian Migrants during Transition and Enlargements," IZA Discussion Papers 8690, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    4. Kahanec, Martin & Zimmermann, Klaus F. & Kureková, Lucia Mýtna & Biavaschi, Costanza, 2013. "Report No. 56: Labour Migration from EaP Countries to the EU – Assessment of Costs and Benefits and Proposals for Better Labour Market Matching," IZA Research Reports 56, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    5. Michael Fertig, 2013. "Mobility in an enlarging European Union: Projections of potential flows from EU's eastern neighbors and Croatia," Discussion Papers 18, Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).
    6. Magdalena M. Ulceluse, 2017. "Self-employment effects of restrictive immigration policies: the case of transitional arrangements in the EU," Discussion Papers 47, Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).
    7. Martin Kahanec & Mariola Pytliková, 2017. "The economic impact of east–west migration on the European Union," Empirica, Springer;Austrian Institute for Economic Research;Austrian Economic Association, pages 407-434.
    8. Martin Kahanec, 2013. "Skilled Labor Flows: Lessons from the European Union," Research Reports 1, Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).
    9. repec:aes:amfeco:v:46:y:2017:i:19:p:670 is not listed on IDEAS
    10. Martin Kahanec, 2013. "Labor mobility in an enlarged European Union," Chapters,in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 7, pages 137-152 Edward Elgar Publishing.
    11. Brian Fabo, 2013. "Migration strategies of the crisis-stricken youth in an enlarged European Union," Discussion Papers 6, Central European Labour Studies Institute (CELSI).
    12. Klára FÓTI, 2011. "Mobility in Europe since the Eastern enlargement: emergence of a European labour market?," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 2, pages 93-107, December.
    13. Barslund, Mikkel & Busse, Matthias, 2014. "Making the Most of EU Labour Mobility," CEPS Papers 9701, Centre for European Policy Studies.
    14. Anzelika Zaiceva, 2014. "Post-enlargement emigration and new EU members' labor markets," IZA World of Labor, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA), pages 1-40, August.
    15. Kahanec, Martin, 2012. "Report No. 49: Skilled Labor Flows: Lessons from the European Union," IZA Research Reports 49, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    16. Kahanec, Martin & Kureková, Lucia Mýtna, 2014. "Did Post-Enlargement Labor Mobility Help the EU to Adjust During the Great Recession? The Case of Slovakia," IZA Discussion Papers 8249, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
    17. Michael Fertig & Martin Kahanec, 2015. "Projections of potential flows to the enlarging EU from Ukraine, Croatia and other Eastern neighbors," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 4(1), pages 1-27, December.
    18. Anna Cristina d'Addio & Maria Chiara Cavalleri, 2015. "Labour Mobility and the Portability of Social Rights in the EU," CESifo Economic Studies, CESifo, vol. 61(2), pages 346-376.
    19. Christoph Skupnik, 2014. "EU enlargement and the race to the bottom of welfare states," IZA Journal of Migration, Springer;Forschungsinstitut zur Zukunft der Arbeit GmbH (IZA), vol. 3(1), pages 1-21, December.
    20. Cristian ÎNCALŢĂRĂU & Liviu-George MAHA, 2012. "The impact of remittances on consumption and investment in Romania," Eastern Journal of European Studies, Centre for European Studies, Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, vol. 3, pages 61-86, December.
    21. Dr Katerina Lisenkova & Iana Liadze & Dr Ian Hurst, 2014. "Overview of the NiGEM-S Model: Scottish version of the National Institute Global Econometric Model," National Institute of Economic and Social Research (NIESR) Discussion Papers 422, National Institute of Economic and Social Research.
    22. Ludmila Fadejeva & Ieva Opmane, 2016. "Internal labour market mobility in 2005–2014 in Latvia: the micro data approach," Baltic Journal of Economics, Baltic International Centre for Economic Policy Studies, vol. 16(2), pages 152-174.
    23. Hudecz, András, 2012. "Párhuzamos történetek. A lakossági devizahitelezés kialakulása és kezelése Lengyelországban, Romániában és Magyarországon
      [Parallel stories. The development and treatment of household foreign-curre
      ," Közgazdasági Szemle (Economic Review - monthly of the Hungarian Academy of Sciences), Közgazdasági Szemle Alapítvány (Economic Review Foundation), vol. 0(4), pages 349-411.

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