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Returning Home at Times of Trouble? Return Migration of EU Enlargement Migrants during the Crisis

  • Anzelika Zaiceva

    ()

  • Klaus F. Zimmermann

The eastern enlargements of the EU in 2004 and 2007 have stimulated the mobility of workers from the new EU8 and EU2 countries. A significant proportion of these migrants stayed abroad only temporarily, and the Great recession may have triggered return intentions. However, a return may be postponed if the economic situation in a sending region is persistently worse. This paper documents emerging evidence on return migration in post-enlargement Europe combining several data sources to describe the characteristics and selection of the returnees, as well as the determinants of return migration and potential re-migration decisions. The findings suggest that brain circulation rather than brain drain is relevant for several new member states and that returnees are most likely to migrate again. Moreover, the proportion of potential movers is larger in countries most affected by the crisis. Repeat and circular migration is expected to alleviate the potential negative impacts of the crisis, leading to a more efficient allocation of resources within the enlarged EU

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Paper provided by University of Modena and Reggio E., Dept. of Economics "Marco Biagi" in its series Center for Economic Research (RECent) with number 089.

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Length: pages 28
Date of creation: Feb 2013
Date of revision:
Handle: RePEc:mod:recent:089
Contact details of provider: Web page: http://www.recent.unimore.it/

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  1. Anna Iara, 2006. "Skill Diffusion by Temporary Migration? Returns to Western European Working Experience in the EU Accession Countries," wiiw Balkan Observatory Working Papers 69, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  2. Barrett, Alan & Kelly, Elish, 2010. "The Impact of Ireland's Recession on the Labour Market Outcomes of its Immigrants," Papers WP355, Economic and Social Research Institute (ESRI).
  3. Amelie F. Constant & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2012. "The Dynamics of Repeat Migration: A Markov Chain Analysis," International Migration Review, Wiley Blackwell, vol. 46(2), pages 362-388, 06.
  4. Karin Mayr & Giovanni Peri, 2009. "Brain Drain and Brain Return: Theory and Application to Eastern-Western Europe," NRN working papers 2009-19, The Austrian Center for Labor Economics and the Analysis of the Welfare State, Johannes Kepler University Linz, Austria.
  5. Enel Pungas & Ott Toomet & Tiit Tammaru & Kristi Anniste, 2012. "Are Better Educated Migrants Returning? Evidence from Multi-Dimensional Education Data," Norface Discussion Paper Series 2012018, Norface Research Programme on Migration, Department of Economics, University College London.
  6. Amelie F. Constant & Olga Nottmeyer & Klaus F. Zimmermann, 2013. "The economics of circular migration," Chapters, in: International Handbook on the Economics of Migration, chapter 3, pages 55-74 Edward Elgar.
  7. Rinne, Ulf & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2011. "Another Economic Miracle? The German Labor Market and the Great Recession," IZA Discussion Papers 6250, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  8. Kahanec, Martin & Zaiceva, Anzelika & Zimmermann, Klaus F., 2009. "Lessons from Migration after EU Enlargement," IZA Discussion Papers 4230, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  9. Anna Iara, 2008. "Skill Diffusion by Temporary Migration? Returns to Western European Work Experience in Central and East European Countries," wiiw Working Papers 46, The Vienna Institute for International Economic Studies, wiiw.
  10. Hazans, Mihails & Philips, Kaia, 2011. "The Post-Enlargement Migration Experience in the Baltic Labor Markets," IZA Discussion Papers 5878, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  11. Kim, Anna Myunghee, 2010. "Foreign Labour Migration and the Economic Crisis in the EU: Ongoing and Remaining Issues of the Migrant Workforce in Germany," IZA Discussion Papers 5134, Institute for the Study of Labor (IZA).
  12. Amelie Constant & Klaus Zimmermann, 2011. "Circular and Repeat Migration: Counts of Exits and Years Away from the Host Country," Population Research and Policy Review, Springer, vol. 30(4), pages 495-515, August.
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